UK – Man arrested in DNP illegal selling operation

The man from West London is suspected of supplying this highly toxic chemical which has been misused as a fat burning supplement and has been the cause of a number of recent deaths.

This morning, Ealing and Harrow Borough Councils, accompanied by the FSA’s National Food Crime Unit (NFCU) have conducted searches on two properties in Ealing and Harrow alongside the Metropolitan Police.

A significant amount of a substance believed to be DNP was found at the premises.

The NFCU launched an operation in April 2015 following the death of 21-year old Eloise Parry after she had bought DNP online. As a result, several websites were identified by the NFCU as selling DNP as a slimming aid and were subsequently closed down.

Andy Morling, Head of Food Crime at the Food Standards Agency, said: ‘It is illegal to sell DNP for human consumption as it is a dangerous industrial chemical. Last year, DNP was responsible for five deaths. I would like to thank all those involved in this operation that aimed to tackle the online sale of DNP. It is our close working partnership with local authorities, law enforcement agencies and internet companies in the UK and abroad that has enabled us to close these websites and work to disrupt possible supply chains.’

‘The FSA and its partners would like to use this as an opportunity to once again highlight the dangers of DNP. It is an industrial chemical and is not made to be consumed as a diet supplement. Please do not be persuaded by the claims being made, those selling DNP do not care about your wellbeing.’

DNP has legitimate uses in areas such as biochemical research and in manufacturing chemicals. For this reason, DNP is not illegal for sale but it is illegal where sold for human consumption.

(Source: FSA website)

SPAIN – Draft Royal Decree on quality standard for flours, meals and other products of cereal milling

Spain notified to the TRIS service (Directive 98/34/EC) of the EU Commission the following draft decree. It intends to establish basic quality standards for the preparation and sale of flours, meals and other products of cereal milling intended for human consumption.

Existing technical sanitary regulations for the preparation, movement and sale of wheat meals and flours and other milling products thereof, for human consumption, date from 1984. Given the changes undergone by the sector for the manufacture and sale of cereal meals and flours since then, and the hygiene and sanitary changes that have had to be made to adapt the content of said regulations to horizontal Community provisions relating to foodstuffs, said standard needs to be reviewed and updated, primarily to expand the scope to cover all cereals, not just wheat, include new product names and amend the terms used in certain existing names.

End of the standstill period: 28th December 2015.

Regarding mandatory information it states that (art. 5 par. 2):

a) The legal description of the products covered by Article 2(5) to (17) shall be as indicated in each section and by a combination of same where appropriate. They may include usage instructions or recommendations.

b) The instruction “Keep in a cool dry place off the floor” shall be included on the label.

c) The best-before date shall be accompanied where necessary by a reference to the storage conditions to be observed to ensure conservation until that date.

Regarding voluntary food information, the label may include information on the following:

a) The bread-making quality of the wheat flour, using the descriptions for different types (very strong, strong, medium strength and bread-making) included in the annex, as a function of the characteristics of the flour. This information must be included in the same visual field as the product description.

b) The quality of the fine hard-wheat meals, indicating “superior-quality meal for making pasta” or “meal for other industrial uses”, as provided for in Article 4(2)(c).

c) Any other specific technical or product-quality characteristics, pursuant to the regulations on the labelling of foodstuffs, that can be demonstrated using internationally recognised analytical methods, in order to guide users.

In products intended for industrial use, the mandatory information provided for in this standard and in the applicable regulations on foodstuff labelling may be included exclusively in the commercial documents accompanying the product at the time it is delivered, or before this time, provided that the following is indicated on the packaging or container: “Not intended for retail sale” or “Product intended for industrial use”. In the case of bulk sale for industrial use, the information required pursuant to this article must be included in the related shipping documentation.