Food Law in Asia and Food Law in US Conference (Rome 16-17th April 2018)

Also in 2018 I am honored to chair and organize with Lexxion, the II edition of the amazing Food Law in Asia Conference + the Food Law in US, after the 1st successful edition in Amsterdam (2017). It will take place in the full of spring in the beautiful Rome, at Hotel Victoria

For all Foodlawlatest.com reader, there is a 10% discount ready to go (see coupon at the end of the article).

CONFERENCE PRESENTATION

With a growth in free trade agreements and the decline of traditional trade barriers, the Asian countries have emerged into one of the most promising regions for food and beverage companies to find new markets for export, however, the complex regulatory frameworks in many Asian jurisdictions often impose big obstacles.

High-profile lecturers from industry, food associations and private legal practice will provide you with a general overview of Food Law in Asia, update you on the legal frameworks in China, India and South Korea and share with you their knowledge and useful tips.

The conference on Food Law in Asia will be followed by a new event on Food Law in the US, shedding light on topics such as export of food and alcoholic beverages to the US, labelling, food recalls, health claims and reforms implemented through the Food Safety Modernisation Act (FSMA).

Both conferences are aimed at food industry representatives interested in export as well as professionals dealing with US and Asian food law on a regular basis. You can benefit from a discount for double-registration and use the opportunity to meet and discuss with food law experts from Europe, Asia and the US.

The conferences will include also practical workshops about how to draft a label for specific countries (e.g. China, India) and high level networking will be eased by the conference format and the wonderful time that you will spend in Rome.

Between the SPEAKERS we will have:

ASIA

  • Nicola Aporti, Head of Corporate and Food Regulatory, HFG Law & Intellectual Property, Shanghai
  • YiFan Jiang, Head of Science and Regulatory Affairs, Food Industry Asia (FIA), Singapore
  • Harsh Gursahani, Associate at PLR Chambers, Consultant for International Trade Laws, New Delhi
  • Bongchul Kim, Associate Professor Hankuk, University of Foreign Studies, Seoul, South Korea
  • Manuela Beatrisotti, EMEA Technical Regulatory Manager, Barilla, Italy

US

  • Katia Merten-Lentz, Partner at Keller & Heckman, Brussels
  • Jonathan Coleman, Food Law Advisor, Campden BRI Group, Nutfield
  • Maile Gradison Hermida, and Elizabeth B. Fawell, Partners at Hogan Lovells, Washington

From the following links, you can see the updated programs (Asia, US), download the unique brochure and register (Asia, US) .

You can redeem a 10% discount as Foodlawlatest reader, using the following code: EFFLSPEAKERCV

Products’ safety self declaration in Vietnam?

Decree No 15, effective since 2 February, 2018, will permit organisations and individuals producing and selling food to self-declare food-product origins and quality, replacing the long-standing method of keeping records at public management agencies and ask for authorizations.

According to local businesses, in the past, to apply for the certificate, an enterprise must prepare two sets of documents and each set had 11 different kinds of papers.

According to a survey of the Central Institute for Economic Management announced recently said that to apply for a food safety hygiene certificate, each enterprise must pay about VN$10 million (US$440), and VN$30 million (US$1,300) in some cases.

(Source: Vietnam Net, Vietnam Plus)

I am totally against the meaningless bureaucracy and very well aware of the global trend of shifting responsibilities to the food business operators and enhancing private-public cooperation control models: this is the future, since the competent authorities won’t have the means and the budgets to check everything. The number of checks to perform is too high and the type of controls too wide.

But, in a country where the food safety average level is still one of the worst worldwide (see one of the thousands of articles regarding the topic: link) maybe this is a too bald move: Vietnam, according to the above mentioned trend, is also strengthening the criminal and administrative sanctions for food safety violations and reviewing the existing food legislation, to protect domestic consumers and meet the strictest requirements of some importing countries (like the EU block itself).

My doubt is that in an environment still not characterized by a solid business culture, this decision would be a step back on this road.