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Food Recall Australia – Breakfast Cereals for glass fragment

breakage

Coles Supermarkets has recalled Coles Right Start Fruit and Fibre from Coles supermarkets, Coles online and Bi-Lo stores nationally due to the presence of foreign matter (glass). Food products containing glass may cause injury if consumed. Consumers should not eat this product and should return the products to the place of purchase for a full refund.

Date notified to FSANZ: 13/09/2014

Food type: Breakfast Cereal

Product name: Coles Right Start Fruit and Fibre

Package description and size: Cardboard Box, 600g

Date marking: Best Before 11 07 15

Country of origin: New Zealand

Reason for recall: The presence of foreign matter (glass)

Distribution: Coles supermarkets, Coles online and Bi-Lo stores nationally

Consumer advice: Food products containing glass may cause injury if consumed. Consumers should not eat this product and should return the products to the place of purchase for a full refund.

Contact: Coles Supermarkets – 0427 454 49658 – www.coles.com.au

(Source: FSANZ Website)

Thank god it’s Friday! Quick news from the world (Week 36)

Weekend-Edition-Image

Here is my selection of articles of the week:

EU

EFSA stymies progress on ‘may contain’, by Rick Pendrous+ on www.foodmanufacture.co.uk, 11-Sep-2014: Alpro’s decision to reverse plans to combine its soya and nut production lines has shone the spotlight on the need for usable ‘action levels’ for adventitious allergen contamination of foods.

RUSSIA

Russia bans Ukraine confectionery imports, by Oliver Nieburg+ on confectionerynews.com, 05-Sep-2014: Russian authorities have imposed an import ban on confectionery produced in Ukraine.

TAIWAN

Taiwan Firm Recalls 12 Products Possibly Made With Recycled Waste Oilon foodsafetynews.com, 08-Set-2014;

Supplier fined heavily in midst of Taiwan’s 780t recycled oil scandal, by RJ Whitehead on foodnavigator-asia.com, 11-Sep-2014: a Taiwanese food company has been handed a severe fine for selling lard made from cooking oil that had been recycled from kitchen waste and grease from leather processing plants.

UK

Food safety powers must have teeth, The Guardian, 05-Sep-2014: a series of interesting opinions about food frauds in the supply chain and the Elliot review;

Food groups welcome Elliott’s final report – mostly, by Mike Stones+ on foodmanufacture.co.uk, 05-Sep-2014: food industry groups have broadly welcomed Professor Elliott’s final report into the integrity of food supply chains and his eight-point plan to tackle fraud. Another round of comments on the Elliot Review;

- New Food Police Unit Coming Soon to the UKby Dan Flinn on foodsafetynews.com, 10-Sep-2014; interesting article, with references to the Danish Food Crime Unit and the Dutch Food Crime Unit;

Kellogg UK ‘30% less fat’ Special K porridge ad banned, by Kacey Culliney+ on foodnavigator.com, 10-Sep-2014: Kellogg’s Special K Multigrain porridge ad claiming fat level supremacy in the market has been banned after 15 complaints, including one from PepsiCo.

US – FOODBORNE ILLNESSES

Encourage Reporting of Suspected Foodborne Illness, by Harlan Stueven, M.D., an emergency physician, poisoning specialist and founder of DiningGrades.comon foodsafetymagazine.com, 02-Sep-2014: the article examines the consequences of foodborne outbreak for restaurants and the lack of a universal and quick reporting system.

Food recalls in Canada – E.coli (0157:H7) in pork and undeclared allergens

Escherichia_coli_13776880

Food Recall Warning – Raw pork products sold by V&T Meat and Food, Calgary, Alberta and Hiep Thanh Trading, Edmonton, Alberta recalled due to E. coli O157:H7

Recall date: September 4, 2014 
Reason for recall: Microbiological – E. coli O157:H7
Hazard classification: Class 1
Company / Firm: Hiep Thanh Trading, V&T Meat and Food
Distribution: Alberta
Extent of the distribution: Retail

Recall details

Ottawa, September 4, 2014 – V&T Meat and Food, Calgary, Alberta and Hiep Thanh Trading, Edmonton, Alberta, are recalling certain raw pork products from the marketplace due to possible E. coli O157:H7 contamination. Consumers, food service establishments, retailers, distributors and manufacturers in Alberta, should not consume, serve, use, or sell certain raw pork products sold by these two retailers/distributors because the raw pork products may be contaminated with E. coli O157:H7.

All raw pork products sold from these locations, during the identified time periods, are affected by this recall.

Company name Address City Affected Selling Dates
V&T Meat and Food 3012-17 Avenue SE, #6 Calgary, AB Between July 14, 2014 and
September 2, 2014, inclusively
Hiep Thanh Trading 10718-98 Street NW Edmonton, AB Between July 10, 2014 and
September 3, 2014, inclusively

These raw pork products may have been sold by other retailers. Consumers who are unsure if they have the affected products are advised to check with their retailer.

What you should do

Check to see if you have recalled products in your home. Recalled products should be thrown out or returned to the store where they were purchased.

Food contaminated with E. coli O157:H7 may not look or smell spoiled but can still make you sick. Symptoms can include nausea, vomiting, mild to severe abdominal cramps and watery to bloody diarrhea. In severe cases of illness, some people may have seizures or strokes, need blood transfusions and kidney dialysis or live with permanent kidney damage. In severe cases of illness, people may die.

Background

This recall was triggered by the E. coli O157:H7 foodborne outbreak investigation led by Alberta Health Services (http://www.albertahealthservices.ca/10353.asp) and supported by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA).

As the investigation proceeds, if other high-risk products are recalled, the CFIA will notify the public through updated Food Recall Warnings.

Alberta Health Services and the CFIA are verifying that industry is removing recalled product from the marketplace.

Illnesses

Further analysis is underway to determine if these affected products are linked to some of the E. coli O157:H7 illnesses in Alberta.

——————

Food Recall Warning – Raw pork products sold at Trimming Fresh Meats Ltd. and Hiep Hoa Asian Food in Calgary, Alberta recalled due to E. coli O157:H7

Recall date: September 6, 2014
Reason for recall: Microbiological – E. coli O157:H7
Hazard classification: Class 1
Company / Firm: V&T Meat Wholesale
Distribution: Alberta
Extent of the distribution: Retail

Recall details

Ottawa, September 6, 2014 – V&T Meat Wholesale, Chestermere, Alberta is recalling certain raw pork products from the marketplace due to possible E. coli O157:H7 contamination. Consumers, food service establishments, retailers, distributors and manufacturers in Alberta, should not consume, serve, use, or sell certain raw pork products sold by the retailers, listed below, because the raw pork products may be contaminated with E. coli O157:H7.

The affected raw pork products have only been distributed in Alberta.

All raw pork products sold from these locations, during the identified time periods, are affected by this recall.

Company name Address City Affected Selling Dates
Trimming Fresh Meats Ltd. 3-6219 CentreSt NW Calgary Between July 15, 2014 and July 22, 2014, inclusively
Hiep Hoa Asian Food E-4710-17 AveSE Calgary Between July 15, 2014 and July 29, 2014, inclusively; and between August 14, 2014 and August 17, 2014, inclusively

What you should do

Check to see if you have recalled products in your home. Recalled products should be thrown out or returned to the store where they were purchased.

Food contaminated with E. coli O157:H7 may not look or smell spoiled but can still make you sick. Symptoms can include nausea, vomiting, mild to severe abdominal cramps and watery to bloody diarrhea. In severe cases of illness, some people may have seizures or strokes, need blood transfusions and kidney dialysis or live with permanent kidney damage. In severe cases of illness, people may die.

Background

This recall was triggered by the E. coli O157:H7 foodborne outbreak investigation led by Alberta Health Services and supported by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA).

As the investigation proceeds, if other high-risk products are recalled, the CFIA will notify the public through updated Food Recall Warnings.

Alberta Health Services and the CFIA are verifying that industry is removing recalled product from the marketplace.

Illnesses

There has been one reported illness associated with the consumption of these products.

——————–

Food Recall Warning – Frozen pork spring rolls, pork buns and pork wontons sold from Vinh Fat Food Products in Edmonton, Alberta recalled due to E. coli O157:H7

Recall date: September 5, 2014
Reason for recall: Microbiological – E. coli O157:H7 
Hazard classification: Class 1
Company / Firm: Vinh Fat Food Products
Distribution: Alberta
Extent of the distribution: Retail

Recall details

Ottawa, September 5, 2014 – Vinh Fat Food Products is recalling frozen pork spring rolls, pork buns and pork wontons from the marketplace due to possible E. coli O157:H7 contamination. Consumers should not consume the recalled products described below.

The following frozen pork products have been sold exclusively from Vinh Fat Food Products, 10630-97th Street, Edmonton, Alberta.

Recalled products

Brand Name Common Name Size UPC Additional Info
Pork Spring Rolls Variable None Affected Selling Dates: Between July 10, 2014 and September 5, 2014, inclusively
Pork Buns Variable None Affected Selling Dates: Between July 10, 2014 and September 5, 2014, inclusively
Pork Wontons Variable None Affected Selling Dates: Between July 10, 2014 and September 5, 2014, inclusively

What you should do

Check to see if you have recalled products in your home. Recalled products should be thrown out or returned to the store where they were purchased.

Food contaminated with E. coli O157:H7 may not look or smell spoiled but can still make you sick. Symptoms can include nausea, vomiting, mild to severe abdominal cramps and watery to bloody diarrhea. In severe cases of illness, some people may have seizures or strokes, need blood transfusions and kidney dialysis or live with permanent kidney damage. In severe cases of illness, people may die.

Background

This recall was triggered by the E. coli O157:H7 foodborne outbreak investigation led by Alberta Health Services and supported by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA).

As the investigation proceeds, if other high-risk products are recalled, the CFIA will notify the public through updated Food Recall Warnings.

Alberta Health Services and the CFIA are verifying that industry is removing recalled product from the marketplace.

Illnesses

There have been no reported illnesses associated with the consumption of these products.

Update 10th September 2014

Ottawa, September 10, 2014 – The food recall warning issued on September 5, 2014 has been updated to include additional distribution information and selling dates. This additional information was identified during the outbreak investigation led by Alberta Health Services (AHS) and supported by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA).

Vinh Fat Food Products is recalling frozen pork spring rolls, pork buns and pork wontons from the marketplace due to possible E. coliO157:H7 contamination. Consumers should not consume the recalled products described below.

The following frozen pork products have been sold from Vinh Fat Food Products, 10630-97th Street, Edmonton, and may have also been sold by other retailers in Alberta.

Consumers who are unsure if they have the affected products are advised to check with their retailer.

Recalled products

Brand Name Common Name Size UPC Additional Info
Pork Spring Rolls Variable None Affected Selling Dates
Between July 10, 2014 and September 8, 2014, inclusively
Pork Buns Variable None Affected Selling Dates
Between July 10, 2014 and September 8, 2014, inclusively
Pork Wontons Variable None Affected Selling Dates
Between July 10, 2014 and September 8, 2014, inclusively

——————–

Food Recall Warning (Allergen) – Soup Stock imported by Sheung Kee Trading recalled due to undeclared sulphites

Recall date: September 5, 2014
Reason for recall: Allergen – Sulphites
Hazard classification: Class 3
Company / Firm: Sheung Kee Trading Co. Inc.
Distribution: Ontario
Extent of the distribution: Retail
Reference number: 9219

Recalled products

Brand Name Common Name Size Code(s) on Product UPC
N/A (Chinese Characters Only) Soup Stock 40 g 30-06-15 7 21731 11609 8

——————–

Food Recall Warning (Allergen) – EMB brand biscuits recalled due to undeclared milk

Recall date: September 5, 2014
Reason for recall: Allergen – Milk
Hazard classification: Class 2
Company / Firm: Super Asia Foods & Spices Ltd.
Distribution: Ontario
Extent of the distribution: Retail
Reference number: 9196

Recalled products

Brand Name Common Name Size Code(s) on Product UPC
EBM Brands Click Cumin Biscuit 142 g All codes where milk is not declared on the label. 8 964000 684009
EBM Brands Butter Puff Biscuit 105 g All codes where milk is not declared on the label. 8 964000 684559
EBM Brands Party Biscuits with Raisins & Peanuts 135.8g All codes where milk is not declared on the label. 8 964000 684238

(Source: CFIA website)

Food recall in EU – Week 36/2014

Ginger-Powder-1024x640

This week on the RASFF database (Rapid Alert System for Food and Feed) we have one recall from consumers in EU in the alert notifications:

Pathogenic micro-organisms: Salmonella Typhimurium in dried ginger powder, following an official control on the market. Origin Spain, notified by Finland.

Between the information for follow-up notifications, we can find another recall from consumers:

Pathogenic micro-organisms: Norovirus in frozen precooked mussels, following an official control on the market. Origin Spain, notified by Italy.

Between the alert notifications, followed by a withdrawal from the market of the product, we find:

Pathogenic micro-organisms: Listeria Monocytogenes in frozen meat skewer, following company’s own check. Origin Austria, notified by Netherlands;

Pathogenic micro-organisms: Salmonella in sweet peppers powder, following an official control on the market. Origin Spain, notified by Netherlands.

Amongst border rejections we have:

- aflatoxins in groundnuts from India (dispatched from Egypt), in shelled pistachios from Turkey and in raw shelled groundnuts from Brazil;

poor temperature control of frozen tuna loins from Papua New Guinea;

Salmonella anatum in frozen boneless beef tenderloin from Uruguay;

Salmonella and carbendazim in paan leaves from India;

- attempt to illegally import paan leaves from Bangladesh and frozen bovine tongues from Brazil;

thiophanate-methyl in sweet peppers from Turkey;

- unauthorised substance carbofuran in eggplants from the Dominican Republic;

malathion in dried mung beans from Ethiopia;

absence of health certificate(s) for dried oloyin beans from Nigeria;

pyrimethanil, penconazole, iprodione, acetamiprid, tebuconazole, tetraconazole, indoxacarb, famoxadone, methoxyfenozide, difenoconazole, azoxystrobin, boscalid, myclobutanil, mandipropamid, pyraclostrobin and proquinazid in vine leaves in brine from Turkey.

For feed, we have a border rejection for spoilage of cotton seeds from Argentina infested with moulds and for Salmonella in dog chews.. In Germany we have also a seizure of maize from Serbia (via Netherlands), due to the presence of aflatoxins.

For food contact materials we have:

an information for attention notification, followed by a recall from consumers:

- Migration of bis(2-ethylhexyl) terephthalate (DOTP) from lids of glass jars containing red chili paste, following company’s own check. Origin Thailand, notified by Finland, distributed also to Estonia;

an alert notification, followed by a withdrawal from the market:

Migration of lead from porcelain plates, following a border control. Origin China (via Hong Kong), notified by Latvia, distributed also to Estonia and Lithuania.

Related articles

Written Q&A to EU Commission – India’s boycott of European oil and wine

interrogation point

Question for written answer to the Commission – Mara Bizzotto (NI)

24th July 2014

Subject: India’s boycott of European oil and wine

India is currently implementing a tough trade protection measure and is boycotting certain European food products. The Indian authorities have, in fact, decided to enforce more stringently their rules on food fraud and labelling. Indian Customs have therefore seized, and blocked in their ports, tonnes of food and alcohol from Europe because their labels do not indicate the precise content of salt, as prescribed by Indian health legislation. In Mumbai alone, to give but one example, 35 containers full of Italian and Spanish olive oil and hundreds of bottles of wine have, for two whole months, been crammed into warehouses that are not suitable for preserving the products, which by now will have almost certainly perished. This restrictive interpretation of customs regulations by the Indian authorities, to the detriment of European products, was adopted after the EU halted and then banned imports of the Alphonso variety of mango.

Can the Commission therefore answer the following questions:

  • Will it take action to resolve the situation and protect free competition?
  • Will it also provide financial assistance to European producers who have suffered damage?

Answer given by Mr De Gucht on behalf of the Commission – 3rd September 2014

The Commission is aware of the problems European food exporters face in India due to stringent enforcement of Indian food labelling and food safety requirements. The Indian authorities appeared to have started this stringent enforcement in September 2013 by discontinuing the acceptance of stickers for labelling of mandatory information. Since February 2014 Indian food safety authorities also require that labels of spirits list ingredients. In addition to the blocked shipments of spirits, the Commission is aware that some European wine shipments were not released by Indian authorities due to labelling deficiencies. Moreover some European olives, preserved by oxidation, were not cleared initially as Indian food safety standards do not include this preservation method that results in a lower salt content than usual for other types of preserved olives.

The Commission has taken up these issues since the autumn of 2013 and has raised it at several occasions with Indian authorities, including at Commissioner’s level, and at plenary sessions of the Technical Barriers to Trade (TBT) Committee of the World Trade Organisation (WTO). The Commission continues to raise this issue with Indian authorities to try to find solution while noting that food products imported into India must comply with the Indian requirements for labelling and food safety.

The Commission does not provide financial assistance to European exporters that may have been impacted by the requirements of Indian authorities.

(Source: European Parliament)

 

 

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USA – Sauce recalled due to potential Clostridium Botulinum presence

Clostridium_difficile

Contact
Consumer:
509-879-0325

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE – September 3, 2014 – Tullia’s is recalling Italian Meatless Pasta Sauce code 530140. This recall has been initiated because a records review by the Washington State Department of Agriculture revealed that one batch of sauce produced with the 530140 code had a pH level high enough to allow the growth of Clostridium botulinum. If present, this organism can cause botulism, a serious and potentially fatal foodborne illness.

Foodborne botulism is a severe type of food poisoning caused by the ingestion of foods containing the potent neurotoxin formed during growth of the organism. Foodborne botulism can cause the following symptoms: general weakness, dizziness, double-vision and trouble with speaking or swallowing. Difficulty in breathing, weakness of other muscles, abdominal distension and constipation may also be common symptoms. People experiencing these problems should seek immediate medical attention. Consumers are warned not to use the product even if it does not look or smell spoiled

Recalled sauce is packaged in 16 OZ. and 32 OZ. clear glass bottles with white caps. The code can be found on the label and is in blue ink. The only code of Tullia’s Italian Meatless Pasta Sauce recalled is 530140.

The recalled sauce was sold in the following markets in the Spokane area: Rosauer’s; Yoke’s; Egger’s (West Rosewood); Trading Company Stores (Spokane); Main Market; and Albertson’s (Wandermere Mall).

Tullia’s has made the decision to recall this product to ensure the safety of their customers. The company has not been notified of any illness associated with their products.

Consumers who have purchased recalled sauce are urged to return it to the place of purchase for a refund or replacement. Consumers with questions may contact the company at 509-879-0325 during the hours of 3PM to 5PM PST.

(Source: FDA website)

Thank god it’s Friday! News from the food world (Week 35/2014)

Weekend-Edition-Image

Here’s my selection of articles for the week:

ENERGY DRINKS

Energy drink binging, a deep analysis of the phenomena by Dr Stefan Fabiansson, food safety scientist and writer of the blog www.focusonfoodsafety.wordpress.com. He has a past as Professor in Food Safety at the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Chief Scientist at the NSW Food Authority and most recently Head of the Unit for Dietary and Chemical Monitoring at the European Food Safety Authority.

INDIA

Czech Republic confiscates 110kg of Indian botanicals, by Shane Starling+ on foodnavigator-asia.com, 01-Sep-2014: Czech Customs authorities recently seized a shipment of Indian botanicals and have initiated proceedings against the importer, Haveli Foods.

CHINA

- Six Arrested in Chinese Scandal Over Expired Meaton foodsafetynews.com, 02-Sep-2014: the six, who were arrested this past Friday, work for Shanghai Husi Food Co., which was found to be mixing outdated meat in with fresher supplies;

- China Seeks To Build Trust In The Baby Formula Industryby John Balzano, on forbes.com, 02-Sep-2014;

Organic labeling on import food at Lexology.com – HFG Law Firm & Intellectual Property Practice, Association of Corporate Counsel, 17 August 2014

EU

Q&A: GMO cultivation in the EU, European Parliament News, 02-Set-2014: a brief Q&A to better understand EU GMOs regulatory framework.

UK

Health claims law trips up tea firm, by Rod Addy+ on beveragedaily.com, 03-Sep-2014: a company promoting healthy teas has been slammed by the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) after falling foul of the EU’s nutrition and health claims regulation (NHCR).

USA

Groups Call on Seafood Fraud Task Force to Require ‘Robust’ Traceability, on foodsafetynews.com, 03-Sep-2014: earlier this summer, the White House established a Presidential Task Force on Combating Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated Fishing and Seafood Fraud and requested comments from the public to help inform and advise the task force in developing recommendations

FVO Report – Import Controls in Hungary

Bos_taurus_taurus_relaxing

This report describes the outcome of an audit carried out by the Food and Veterinary Office (FVO) in Hungary from 25 March to 1 April 2014 to assess how the competent authorities evaluate the performance and effectiveness of their system of official import controls (regarding live animals and products of animal origin).

The report concludes that the Hungarian authority is developing the activities for verification of effectiveness of the official import controls including the setting of relevant objectives and indicators to measure the extent to which these objectives are met.

The verification activities do not ensure compliance of the official import controls with EU legislation. This is due to the lack of implementation of verification in some border inspection posts (BIPs) for a long period of time. The competent authority has not considered the risk of absence of verification of the official import controls and has not planned such activities for a period of two years. The above undermine the verification of effectiveness of the official import controls as required by article 8 of Regulation (EC) No 882/2004/EC.

The results of the verification activities are foreseen to be used for planning of the official controls and also on planning future verification activities. Activities like performance assessment of personnel, national database (EVIR) to monitor the output of the audits are potential tools to assess effectiveness of the official import controls, not currently used as such. In addition, process
and performance audits as foreseen in the new Quality management procedure can be a means of assessment of the appropriateness and effectiveness of the official import controls.

Salt of the Earth Reveals New GRI Sustainability Report

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As of May 2014,  Salt of the Earth is one of only 36 companies worldwide – and the first Israeli company – to pass GRI materiality matters check in the latest sustainability report for meeting new, advanced GRI-G4 guidelines. The report is based on 2013 performance data.

“Sustainability is an integral part of the Salt of the Earth DNA. From the beginning, the company has taken steps to find the perfect balance between production, society and environment,” says Dovik Tal, CEO for Salt of the Earth. “We are committed to sustainable strategy in every aspect, starting by sourcing high purity sea salt products and taking care of the environment. We are developing a cutting-edge sustainable growth company focused on innovation, pure and high-value products, all with minimal ecological impact”.

The GRI report covers a wide range of sustainable topics, including: environment, minimum ecological impact, wild life preservation, natural processing, water waste management, product innovation, employee training/development and community investment.

Salt of the Earth uses Mother Nature’s resources to produce pure sea salt from the Red Sea and Dead Sea by evaporating the salt in pond system near the sea. This natural processing ensures three main sustainable benefits:

  • Waste not, want not of water management – saving 90% of fresh water consumption, due to the company’s shifting to salt rinsing with sea water. It Supports the US EPA “reuse, reduce, recycle” philosophy.
  • Minimum ecological footprint by implementing responsible management and take care of next generation’s green environment. For example, preserving the balance of marine life forms around the pipelines, preserving biodiversity and promoting educational dialogue on environmental preservation issues including wild life preserve.
  • Collaboration with environmental and bird watching organizations – in two main companysites, Eilat (at Eilat Bird-Watching Park)  and Atlit, birdwatchers are able to watch hundreds of types of birds . In partnership with the Society for the Protection of Nature in Israel and the Nature and Parks Authority in Eilat, the company utilized the ponds and created a beautiful site for birds that attracts thousands of migrating birds.
  • Innovation – developing innovative products for well-being, including low-sodium products, sodium-reduction ingredients and an advanced product line for convenience and gourmet niches.
  • Social responsibility – Salt of the Earth acts according to the principles of sustainability and social responsibility, including continually training and developing its employees, encouraging them to volunteer and help the elderly and schoolchildren. One of its core values is to employ Jews, Arabs and Christians.

“As a productive and innovative company, we believe sustainability is the right approach for responsible management, while minimizing negative impacts and promoting the positive values we share with parties around us, near and far,” adds Tal.

Food recall Canada – Undeclared milk in drink with jelly

pouring milk in a glass isolated

Food Recall Warning (Allergen) – Niru brand Faluda and Sherbet Drink with Jelly recalled due to undeclared milk

Recall date: September 3, 2014
Reason for recall: Allergen – Milk
Hazard classification: Class 1
Company / Firm: Niru Enterprises Inc.
Distribution: Ontario
Extent of the distribution: Retail

Recall details

Ottawa, September 3, 2014 – Niru Enterprises Inc. is recalling Niru brand Faluda and Sherbet Drink with Jelly from the marketplace because they contain milk which is not declared on the label. People with an allergy to milk should not consume the recalled products described below.

Recalled products

Brand Name Common Name Size Code(s) on Product UPC
Niru Sherbet Drink with Jelly 290 mL All codes where milk is not declared 7 79140 00604 2
Niru Faluda (Rose Flavour Drink) 290 mL All codes where milk is not declared 7 79140 00578 6

What you should do

Check to see if you have recalled products in your home. Recalled products should be thrown out or returned to the store where they were purchased.

If you have an allergy to milk, do not consume the recalled products as they may cause a serious or life-threatening reaction.

Background

This recall was triggered by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency’s (CFIA) inspection activities. The CFIA is conducting a food safety investigation, which may lead to the recall of other products. If other high-risk products are recalled, the CFIA will notify the public through updated Food Recall Warnings.

The CFIA is verifying that industry is removing recalled product from the marketplace.

Illnesses

There have been no reported reactions associated with the consumption of these products.

(Source: CFIA website)

Elliot review published today!

Horsemeat-review-to-ask-questions-of-government

Professor Chris Elliott’s final report into the integrity and assurance of UK food supply networks has been published today. You can download the report at the following link.

The review was prompted by growing concerns about the systems used to deter, identify and prosecute food adulteration. The horse meat crisis of 2013 was a trigger, as were concerns about the increasing potential for food fraud and ‘food crime’. Food fraud becomes food crime when it no longer involves random acts by ‘rogues’ within the food industry but becomes an organised activity by groups which knowingly set out to deceive, and or injure, those purchasing food. These incidents can have a huge negative impact both on consumer confidence, and on the reputation and finances of food businesses.

The Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs published also the document Government response to the “Elliott review of the integrity and assurance of food supply networks”.

Enjoy the reading and stay tuned for comments about the documents.

 

Food recalls in US (Week 35/2014)- Parmesan for Salmonella contamination and more

Parmesan

4C Foods Corp. Voluntarily Recalls 4C Grated Cheese Homestyle Parmesan Because of Salmonella Contamination

Contact:
Consumer:
1-718-272-7800 ext. 176

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE – , 2014 – 4C Foods Corp. is recalling its 6-oz. glass jars of “4C Grated Cheese HomeStyle Parmesan“, UPC 0-41387-32790-8 with code dates BEST BY JUL 21 2016 and JUL 22 2016 due to possible contamination with Salmonella. This recall does not impact any other 4C cheese products.

Salmonella is an organism that can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Healthy persons infected with Salmonella often experience fever, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain. In rare circumstances, infection with Salmonella can result in the organism getting into the bloodstream and producing more severe illnesses.

No illnesses have been reported to date in connection with this problem.

On July 24, 2014, Product was distributed to: IA, IL, MI, MN, ND, NE, SD, and WI through retail stores.

Item is packed as 12 glass jars per case, code dates BEST BY JUL 21 2016 and JUL 22 2016 can be located on jar back side toward bottom portion.

The potential risk was brought to 4C’s attention by FDA during routine testing. This recall affects 308 cases that were shipped of the affected date codes.

Consumers do not need to return the product to the store where it was purchased. Instead, consumers are urged to dispose of the recalled product and its container. Please contact 4C Foods at 1-718-272-7800 ext. 176, Monday – Friday, 9:30 AM to 4:30 PM (Eastern Time), for a replacement or full refund and for general inquires.

——————————————————————————————–

Kraft Foods Group Voluntarily Recalls Select Varieties of Regular Kraft American Singles Pasteurized Prepared Cheese Product Due to Ingredient Supplier’s Out-of-Standard Storage Temperatures
7,691 Cases of Four Varieties on two “Best When Used By” Dates Included in The Recall

Contact:
Consumer:
(800) 396-5512

Media:
Russ Dyer
(847) 646-4538
Email: news@kraftfoods.com

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE – NORTHFIELD, Ill. – August 29, 2014 – Kraft Foods Group is voluntarily recalling 7,691 cases of select varieties of regular Kraft American Singles Pasteurized Prepared Cheese Product. A supplier did not store an ingredient used in this product in accordance with Kraft’s temperature standards. While unlikely, this could create conditions that could lead to premature spoilage and/or food borne illness; therefore, the company is issuing the recall as a precaution. Kraft has had no consumer illness complaints for this product associated with this recall. The affected product is limited to four varieties with “Best When Used By” dates of February 20, 2015, and February 21, 2015.

The affected product was shipped to customers across the United States. It was not distributed outside of the United States.

The following varieties are being recalled:

ProductSize
Name of Product
Units/Case
Best When Used By Code Dates
Package Code
Case Code
12 oz. 12 oz Kraft American Singles (16 slices) 48 20 FEB 2015 and 21 FEB 2015 0 21000 60464 7 00 21000 60464 00
16 oz. 16 oz Kraft American Singles (24 slices) (36 count case) 36 20 FEB 2015 0 21000 61526 1 00 21000 61450 00
16 oz. 16 oz Kraft American Singles (24 slices) (12 count case) 12 20 FEB 2015 0 21000 61526 1 00 21000 61526 00
64 oz. 64 oz (4 lb) Kraft American Singles (4×24 slice) 8 20 FEB 2015 0 21000 63360 9 00 21000 62559 00

Consumers can find the “Best When Used By” dates on the bottom of the product package. No other Kraft Singles products are impacted by this recall.

The affected product was produced at Kraft’s Springfield, MO manufacturing facility.

Consumers who purchased any of these products should not eat them. They should return them to the store where purchased for an exchange or full refund. Consumers also can contact Kraft Foods Consumer Relations at 1-800-396-5512.

————————————————————————————————————-

Contact
Consumer:
425-444-3700
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE – August 25, 2014 – Tjs Place of Kirkland Washington is voluntarily recalling approx. 20 containers of Basil Pesto Pasta packed in 8 oz plastic tubs because it has the potential to be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes, an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, listeria infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women.

The recalled Basil Pesto Pasta was sold between the dates 8/18/14 and 8/21/14. The Basil Pesto Pasta affected by this recall has a sticker on the side of the container with either of the following codes: 0825, 0826, 0827, 0828

Basil Pesto Pasta was distributed in convenience stores, pharmacies, cafes and espresso stands located in King and Snohomish counties in Washington State.

The firm is not aware of any reported illnesses to date.

The potential for contamination was discovered after routine testing by the Washington State Department of Agriculture (WSDA) revealed the presence of Listeria monocytogenes in a container of the Basil Pesto Pasta.

Tjs Place has suspended production and distribution of the product while WSDA and the company continue to investigate the source of the problem.

Consumers who have purchased the recalled product are urged not to eat it and to dispose of it or return it to the place of purchase for a full refund. Consumers with questions may contact the company at 425-444-3700 between the hours of 2pm and 4pm.

———————————————————————————————-

La Orocovena Biscuit Voluntarily Recalls Pound Cake de Queso Due to Undeclared Milk, Soy and Wheat

Contact:
Consumer:
Mr. Iram Ortiz Maldonado
(787) 867-3310
(787) 867-7474

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE – August 29, 2014 – Through this means we inform to all La Orocoveña Biscuit clients that we will be conducting a recall of the product Pound Cake de Queso, 2oz. Exp. Dates 08/11/2014 to 10/12/2014, this since the product contains undeclared milk, wheat and soy.

This product was distributed wholesale to our clients who in turn sold this product to retailers only in Puerto Rico from 06/11/2014 to 08/12/2014. As of today, no illness have been reported in relation to this product, but it is of great importance that people who are allergic or sensitive to milk ,wheat or soy do not consume this product as they run the risk of having serious allergic reactions.

This recall was initiated after it was identified during and FDA Inspection that the product label did not mention the presence of milk, wheat and soy contained in the products sub-ingredients.

Consumers who have purchased this product are urged to return it as soon as possible. A credit for the product will be given, once the product is returned.

We apologize for the inconvenience and we will be working to correct this mishap. Your cooperation is necessary to prevent harm to the consumers.

If you have any question please contact Mr. Iram Ortiz Maldonado at (787) 867-3310 or (787) 867-7474 from 8:00am to 4:00pm

Food Safety Practical Seminar – RASFF system explanation and food alert management

hotel_bologna_piazza_maggiore-1024x640

On 30th September in Bologna, I will be speaker in a half-day practical seminar about the RASFF (Rapid Alert System for Food and Feed) and the food alert management. This seminar is organized in strictly cooperation with Eurofishmarket, but it is thought to adapt to every kind of food company. It could be of extreme interest for quality assurance, regulatory and supply chain managers, legal officers and lawyers, veterinaries, as well as officers involved in official controls.

The session will comprise a brief exam of the RASFF origin, of its legal basis and of the functioning/types of notifications. After that we will analyze some practical cases, to better understand why this tool is so useful to guarantee food safety in EU and also which are the possible shortcomings of the system and its future perspectives.

Finally, all the participants will be involved in a brief guided simulation, to apply what we learned during the first part of the course.

The venue will be the meeting room of the restaurant “Leoni” of Bologna (Piazza De Mello, 4 http://www.marcelloleoni.it/dovesiamo.php)

HERE you can find the brochure and all the details to book your place at the seminar, before 16th September.

Eurofishmarket was founded in 2004 and it is a leading firm specialized in marketing, training and legal services on seafood sector.

Eurofishmarket’s Team consists of skilled professionals with a global reach: technical advisors including veterinaries with significant experiences of the fish and aquaculture sector, media experts, video developers and lawyers.

Food recalls in EU – Week 35/2014

pasta_salad

This week on the RASFF database (Rapid Alert System for Food and Feed) we have two recalls from consumers in EU in the alert notifications:

Pathogenic micro-organisms: Listeria Monocytogenes in salads with pasta, following company’s own check. Origin France, notified by France, distributed also to Belgium and Luxembourg;

Allergens: undeclared gluten, egg and mustard in burger saucefollowing company’s own check. Origin Belgium, notified by Belgium, distributed also to France.

Between the alert notifications, followed by a withdrawal from the market of the product, we find:

Biotoxins: Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning (PSP) toxins in chilled scallops, following an official control on the market. Origin Norway, notified by Norway, distributed also to Netherlands and Spain;

Food additives and flavourings: undeclared sulphite in dried apricot, following a border control. Origin Uzbekistan, notified by Latvia, distributed also to Poland;

Mycotoxins: aflatoxins in pistachio nuts, following an official control on the market. Origin Iran (via Poland), notified by Slovakia;

Pathogenic micro-organisms: Listeria Monocytogenes in ham, following company’s own check. Origin Germany, notified by Germany, distributed also to Denmark and Sweden;

Pathogenic micro-organisms: Listeria Monocytogenes in enoki mushrooms, following company’s own check. Origin South Korea, notified by Netherlands, distributed also to Bahrain, Belgium, Finland, France, Spain, Switzerland and United Kingdom;

Pathogenic micro-organisms: Listeria Monocytogenes in smoked halibut fillets, following company’s own check. Origin Belgium, notified by France;

Pesticide residues: carbendazim in pitahaya, following company’s own check. Origin Vietnam, notified by Netherlands, distributed also to Austria, Denmark, Germany, Greece, Italy, Russia and Switzerland.

In Italy we have also a seizure of frozen kebab from Germany, due to the presence of Salmonella.

Amongst border rejections we have:

- aflatoxins in pistachios from Iran, in crushed ground chilli powder from India and in ground nutmeg from Indonesia (via United States);

- too high content of colour E 102 – tartrazine, unauthorised animal ingredient (egg white) and unauthorised use of colour E 132 – indigotine / indigo carmine in noodles from Japan;

- unauthorised use of colour E 127 – erythrosine in and insufficient labelling (tartrazine E102) of sugar coated fennel seeds from India;

shigatoxin-producing Escherichia coli in frozen lamb meat from New Zealand;

norovirus in frozen cooked whole brown clams from Vietnam;

- unauthorised genetically modified (Cry1Ab) rice vermicelli from China;

chlorpyriphos, dimethomorph, boscalid, kresoxim-methyl, pyraclostrobin and metrafenone in pickled vine leaves from Turkey;

triazophos, acetamiprid and imidacloprid in green tea from Turkey;

methomyl and thiodicarb in sweet peppers from Turkey;

- undeclared sulphite in dried prunes from Uzbekistan;

- residue level above MRL for copper in vine leaves from Turkey;

- histamine in frozen yellowfin tuna from Panama;

poor temperature control of frozen shrimps from Peru and of frozen octopus and white grouper from Mauritania;

dioxins and dioxin-like polychlorobifenyls in palm kernel fatty acid disillate from Malaysia;

absence of health certificate(s) for chilled seabream from Senegal unfit for human consumption;

- sunflower meal from Ukraine infested with moulds (visible mould growth on the surface and inside the product, color changed to greygreen with brown and green spots, repulsive odor).

For feed, we don’t have any relevant notification this week.

For food contact materials we have border rejections for migration of formaldehyde and of melamine from melamine boards from China and melamine plates from Hong Kong. Outer coating coming off from knives from China.

Related articles

Food recall in Canada – Seafood pies due to undeclared egg and wheat (allergens)

eggs

Food Recall Warning (Allergen) – Catch of the Bay Fresh Fish Market brand seafood pies recalled due to undeclared egg and wheat

Recall date: August 29, 2014
Reason for recall: Allergen – Egg, Allergen – Wheat
Hazard classification: Class 2
Company / Firm: Masstown Market
Distribution: Nova Scotia
Extent of the distribution: Retail

Recall details

Ottawa, August 29, 2014 – Masstown Market is recalling seafood pies from the marketplace because they contain egg and wheat which are not declared on the label. People with an allergy to egg or wheat should not consume the recalled products described below.

The following products have been sold from Masstown Market in Masstown, Nova Scotia.

Brand Name Common Name Size Code(s) on Product UPC
Catch of the Bay Fresh Fish Market Lobster Seafood Pie 1200 g All Best Before dates where egg and wheat are not declared on the label 205325 119998
Catch of the Bay Fresh Fish Market Atlantic Seafood Pie 1200 g All Best Before dates where egg and wheat are not declared on the label 205324 414995
Recalled products should be thrown out or returned to the store where they were purchased. If you have an allergy to egg or wheat, do not consume the recalled products as they may cause a serious or life-threatening reaction.

Background

This recall was triggered by a consumer complaint. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) is conducting a food safety investigation, which may lead to the recall of other products. If other high-risk products are recalled, the CFIA will notify the public through updated Food Recall Warnings. The CFIA is verifying that industry is removing recalled products from the marketplace.

Illnesses

There has been one reported reaction associated with the consumption of these products.

More information

Masstown Market: Laurie Jennings – 902-662-2816 Laurie@masstownmarket.com

(Source: CFIA website)

Food recalls in EU – Week 34

lambroll2

This week on the RASFF database (Rapid Alert System for Food and Feed) we have four recalls from consumers in EU in the alert notifications:

Pathogenic micro-organisms: foodborne outbreak (20 cases, 12 people dead) caused by Listeria Monocytogenes in lamb-roll sausages, following food poisoning. Origin Denmark, notified by Denmark, distributed also to Germany, Norway and Sweden;

Pathogenic micro-organisms: shigatoxin-producing Escherichia Coli in raw milk cheese, following company’s own check. Origin France, notified by France, distributed also to Czech Republic, Denmark, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Lithuania, Reunion, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, United Arab Emirates and United Kingdom;

Pathogenic micro-organisms: Salmonella enteritidis in whole eggs and whole eggs sleeved pasteurized, following an official control on the market. Origin Denmark, notified by Denmark, distributed also to Czech Republic and Greenland;

Pathogenic micro-organisms: Salmonella enteritidis phagetype D6 in tagliatelle, following an official control on the market. Origin Poland, notified by Germany, distributed also to Belgium and Ireland.

Between the alert notifications, followed by a withdrawal from the market of the product, we find:

Pathogenic micro-organisms: Clostridium botulinum in frozen scallops, following food poisoning. Origin United Kingdom (via Canada), notified by Norway;

Pathogenic micro-organisms: Listeria Monocytogenes in semi-preserved anchovies, following company’s own check. Origin Italy, notified by France;

Pathogenic micro-organisms: foodborne outbreak suspected to be caused by chilled mussels, following food poisoning. Origin Spain, notified by France;

- Non pathogenic micro-organisms: contamination with algae of live mussels, following an official control on the market. Origin Netherlands, notified by Netherlands, distributed also to Belgium and France.

Amongst border rejections we have:

- aflatoxins in crushed chilli and shelled groundnuts from India, in peanuts and groundnuts from China ;

- Salmonella in frozen salted chicken from Thailand and in fresh oregano from Turkey;

- unauthorised use of colour E 124 – Ponceau 4R / cochineal red A in preserved vegetables from Japan;

- blanched hazelnut kernels from Turkey and whole nutmegs from India infested with moulds;

shigatoxin-producing Escherichia coli in chilled lamb and frozen lamb meat from New Zealand;

poor hygienic state (dirty and soaked cartons) of frozen shrimps from India;

- prohibited substance nitrofuran (metabolite) furazolidone (AOZ) in frozen king prawns and raw prawns from India;

anthraquinone and unauthorised substance tolfenpyrad in black tea from China;

- carbendazim and dimethoate in green beans from Kenya;

- formetanate in fresh peppers from Turkey;

- carbaryl in fresh peppers from Thailand;

-  chlorfenapyr in broccoli from China.

For feed, we don’t have any relevant notification this week.

For food contact materials we have border rejections for migration of bis(2-ethylhexyl) terephthalate (DOTP) from glass jar containing garlic and coriander paste from Thailand.

Related articles

Latest Food recalls in US – LIsteria in breaded chicken and allergens (walnuts) in spinach

Listeria

Dole Fresh Vegetables Announces Allergy Alert and Voluntary Limited Recall of DOLE-branded Spinach Due to Possible Contamination by Walnuts

Contact:
Consumer:
1-800-356-3111

Media:
David Bright
1-818-874-4879
David.Bright@Dole.com

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE – August 28, 2014 – Although no illnesses or allergic reactions have been reported, Dole Fresh Vegetables is initiating a limited voluntary recall of the following products:

PRODUCT NAME BAG CODE BEST-BY DATE
DOLE Baby Spinach 6 oz bag
UPC 071430009642
B2311020 9/4/2014
B2311021 9/4/2014
B2311022 9/4/2014
B2311023 9/4/2014
DOLE Spinach 8 oz bag
UPC 071430009765
B2311020 9/4/2014
B2311021 9/4/2014
B2311022 9/4/2014
B2311023 9/4/2014
B2311024 9/4/2014
B2311025 9/4/2014

This recall is due to possible contamination of these products by walnuts. The walnuts fell from a tree into spinach bins being delivered from a field and were discovered at the plant. No illnesses or allergic reactions have been reported. However, people who have an allergy to tree nuts may have a serious or life-threatening allergic reaction if they consume these products or products containing walnuts.

This recall is for Arizona, Nevada, and New Mexico, for only DOLE Baby Spinach 6 oz bags and DOLE Spinach 8 oz bags with the specific Bag Codes and Best-by dates listed above. The bag code and best-by date are on the top right-hand corner of the front of the bag. Consumers who have purchased the designated products are instructed not to consume the product and to call the DOLE Consumer Center toll-free at 1-800-356-3111 from 8am to 3 pm Pacific Time, Monday through Friday, for a refund.

Food safety is the first priority of Dole Fresh Vegetables, so although the contamination is not confirmed, this recall is being initiated in an abundance of caution for the benefit of our customers.

 

New Jersey Firm Recalls Breaded Chicken Product For Possible Listeria Contamination

Class I Recall

Health Risk: High Date: 27/ago/2014

Congressional and Public Affairs
Felicia Thompson
(202) 720-9113

WASHINGTON, August 27, 2014 – TNUVA USA, a Fairfield, N.J., establishment is recalling approximately 8,316 pounds of Mom’s Chicken Extra Thin Cutlets product due to possible contamination with Listeria monocytogenes (Lm), the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.

The product was produced on August 18, 2013, and shipped to the company’s distributor in New Jersey. FSIS will post complete store locations as the list becomes available on its website at www.fsis.usda.gov. The following product is subject to recall: [View Labels (PDF Only)]

  • 28.8-oz. (1.8 lb.) bags containing “MOM’S CHICKEN EXTRA THIN CUTLETS, THIN-CUT BREADED CUTLET SHAPED CHICKEN BREAST PATTIES.”

Bags bear the Israeli establishment number “209” within the Israeli mark of inspection. The product’s expiration date is February 18, 2015, and bears the following UPC number on the packaging: 843426005866.

The problem was discovered when FSIS personnel conducted a routine sampling of product which tested positive for Lm.  FSIS held the product and it did not enter commerce. Further investigation by FSIS determined that other products were produced on the same line without clean up between products. FSIS and the company are concerned that some product may be frozen and in consumers’ freezers. FSIS and the company have received no reports of illnesses associated with consumption of these products

Consumption of food contaminated with Lm can cause listeriosis, a serious infection that primarily affects older adults, persons with weakened immune systems, and pregnant women and their newborns. Less commonly, persons outside these risk groups are affected.

Listeriosis can cause fever, muscle aches, headache, stiff neck, confusion, loss of balance and convulsions sometimes preceded by diarrhea or other gastrointestinal symptoms. An invasive infection spreads beyond the gastrointestinal tract. In pregnant women, the infection can cause miscarriages, stillbirths, premature delivery or life-threatening infection of the newborn. In addition, serious and sometimes fatal infections in older adults and persons with weakened immune systems. Listeriosis is treated with antibiotics. Persons in the higher-risk categories who experience flu-like symptoms within two months after eating contaminated food should seek medical care and tell the health care provider about eating the contaminated food.

FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to verify recalling firms notify their customers of the recall and that steps are taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers. When available, the retail distribution list(s) will be posted on the FSIS website at www.fsis.usda.gov/recalls.

Media and consumers with questions regarding the recall can contact Customer Service at 1-844- GOTNUVA (1-844-468-6882).

Consumers with food safety questions can “Ask Karen,” the FSIS virtual representative available 24 hours a day at AskKaren.gov or via smartphone at m.askkaren.gov. The toll-free USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) is available in English and Spanish and can be reached from l0 a.m. to 4 p.m. (Eastern Time) Monday through Friday. Recorded food safety messages are available 24 hours a day. The online Electronic Consumer Complaint Monitoring System can be accessed 24 hours a day at: http://www.fsis.usda.gov/reportproblem.

Voluntary Recall Notice of Margaret Holmes 14.5 oz Turnip Greens and 14.5 oz Mixed Greens Due to Questionable Seals

Contact
Consumer:
1-800-277-2012

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE – August 27, 2014 – McCall Farms Incorporated is initiating a voluntary recall on 14.5 oz Margaret Holmes Turnip Greens and 14.5 oz Margaret Holmes Mixed Greens due to the potential of questionable seals. This recall does not impact any other Margaret Holmes vegetables.

The affected product was packaged on the same day and has a five digit production lot code of F13EX. Consumers who may have purchased this product can find the lot code information on the top of the can. The UPC code for the Turnip Greens is 41443 10251 and the Mixed Greens is 41443 11271.

The affected product was distributed to retailers in New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Washington DC, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia and Tennessee.

McCall Farms has notified the impacted customers of this issue. Consumers who have purchased this product with the affected lot code are asked to dispose of the product. Consumers do not need to return the product to the store where it was purchased. Please contact McCall Farms consumer services at 1-800-277-2012 Monday through Friday from 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM EST for a replacement or full refund, and with general inquires.

Consumer safety and satisfaction is the top priority for our company. It is for these reasons, that we are taking this step. We sincerely apologize to our customers and consumers for the inconvenience this has caused. We have notified the U.S. Food and Drug Administration of this voluntary recall and will cooperate with them fully.

(Sources: FDA, FSIS websites)

Food recall in Canada – L’Alpette cheese recalled due to a toxin produced by Staphylococcus bacteria

canada
Recall details

Ottawa, August 28, 2014 – Ferme Floralpe Inc. is recalling L’Alpette cheese from the marketplace because it may contain the toxin produced by Staphylococcus bacteria. Consumers should not consume the recalled product described below.

Recall date: August 28, 2014 
Reason for recall: Microbiological – Staphylococcus aureus
Hazard classification: Class 2
Company / Firm: Ferme Floralpe Inc.
Distribution: Ontario, Quebec
Extent of the distribution: Retail
Reference number: 9192
Recalled products

Brand Name Common Name Size Code(s) on Product UPC
L’Alpette Soft ripened sheep cheese 160 g Lot 333
Best before: 14 10 31
None
What you should do
Check to see if you have recalled product in your home. Recalled product should be thrown out or returned to the store where it was purchased. Food contaminated with Staphylococcus toxin may not look or smell spoiled. The toxin produced by Staphylococcus bacteria is not easily destroyed at normal cooking temperatures. Common symptoms of Staphylococcus poisoning are nausea, vomiting, abdominal cramping and fever. In severe cases of illness, headache, muscle cramping and changes in blood pressure and pulse rate may occur.

Background

This recall was triggered by Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) test results. The CFIA is conducting a food safety investigation, which may lead to the recall of other products. If other high-risk products are recalled, the CFIA will notify the public through updated Food Recall Warnings. The CFIA is verifying that industry is removing recalled product from the marketplace.

Illnesses

There have been no reported illnesses associated with the consumption of this product.

Click here for the link to the CFIA warning.

(Source: CFIA website)

Thank god it’s Friday! Quick news from the world (Week 34)

Weekend-Edition-Image

This is a new weekly appointment from Foodlawlatest.com, which I hope you will appreciate. Please let me have your feedback. It’s a summary of interesting and/or particular news I read during the week and that I am glad to share with all our readers.

Good reading…and happy weekend!

CANADA

Canada Now Requiring Labels for Mechanically Tenderized Beef on www.foodsafetynews.com: Canada’s requirement that all mechanically tenderized beef (MTB) be labeled as such and include instructions for safe cooking came into effect on Aug. 21.

CHINA

China Inspection and Quarantine: Importation of Dutch Potatoes to China Approved: legal basis and import requirements of the Chinese legislation, examined by Rachel Shen, Chemlinked, Reach24 Consulting Group;

- Chinese retailer introduces infant formula recall insurance, by Mark Astley+ on www.dairyreporter.com, 25-Aug-2014: Chinese retailer Suning Redbaby has reportedly begun offering an infant formula insurance policy that compensates customers in the event of a recall.

EU – UK

Evidence links salmonella outbreak to imported eggs, by Rod Addy+ on www.foodmanufacture.co.uk, 26-Aug-2014: Health and food safety authorities have confirmed the salmonella outbreak in Europe publicised earlier this week has been linked to eggs.

- EU and Cape Verde agree on new 4 year Protocol to Fisheries Partnership Agreementby European Commission, DG Mare website: the European Union and Cape Verde have agreed on a new Protocol to the Fisheries Partnership Agreement between the European Union and Cape Verde. The four-year Protocol will replace the current Protocol which expires on 31 August 2014.It will allow 71 EU vessels to fish for tuna and other highly migratory species in Cape Verdean waters. In return, the Union has increased its financial contribution and will pay Cape Verde €550 000 per year for the first two years of application and €500 000 per year for the final two years of application.

INDIA

Lindt has had enough of Indian regulations, by Nandini Kumar, Bangalore Mirror Bureau: Lindt & Sprungli has decided to fold its operations in the country after more than two of its consignments brought into India (in August 2013 and January 2014) were sent back due to a new set of import rules.

USA

- Ghirardelli Settles “White Chocolate” Labeling Suit for $5.25 Million, by David Ter Molen, FoodIdentity Blog: Ghirardelli Chocolate Co. has agreed to pay approximately $5.25 million to resolve a putative class action that accused the company of improperly advertising certain products as containing “white chocolate” when they failed to contain cocoa butter, which is required for “white chocolate” or “white chocolate flavor” under FDA regulations.

WHO

- Information Note: Ebola and Food Safety: if food products are properly prepared and cooked, humans cannot become infected by consuming them: the Ebola virus is inactivated through cooking. Basic hygiene measures can prevent infection in people in direct contact with infected animals or with raw meat and by-products. Basic hygiene measures include regular hand washing and changing of clothes and boots before and after touching these animals and their products. However, sick and diseased animal should never be consumed.

FVO Report – Organic production and labelling in France

FoodLawfinal

This report describes the outcome of an audit which took place in France from 9 to 20 September 2013 in order to evaluate the control systems for organic production and labelling of organic products; a previous audit to France on the same topic was carried out in 1999.

There is an overall effective system for controls of organic production and labelling of organic products in France, while national provisions provide a clear legal framework for the implementation of organic production rules although some of them differ from the requirements as laid down in the European Union (EU) legislation.

Control Bodies (CBs) are not always accredited before being approved by the National Institute of Origin and Quality (INAO). This is not in accordance with EU requirements, as accreditation according to norm EN 45011 may sometimes occur a long time after their approval. Although CBs have in general a sufficient number of suitably qualified and experienced staff, deficiencies in the performance of newly recruited staff without appropriate tutoring were noted.  Some controls carried out by the CBs were found to be ineffective. Differences in interpretation of analytical results for residues of pesticides and contaminants were noted between the CBs visited.

In some cases, the threshold for initiation of an investigation was not in accordance with EU legislation. In some cases, CBs did not immediately notify the Central Competent Authority (CCA) when deficiencies, affecting the organic status of the products, had been detected. In a limited number of cases enforcement was weak or missing.

Documentation, issued to operators, setting out their approval status is not published, which is contrary to the requirements of Article 92(a) of Regulation (EC) No 889/2008. As a consequence, those receiving product along the supply chain, those performing controls and consumers, cannot readily verify that suppliers and products have been appropriately certified.

In general, controls on labelling of organic and in-conversion products were effective. Traceability from retailer to the producer was satisfactory (in one case, identifying an ingredient erroneously declared as organic).

The French instructions delegate to CBs the administration of certain exceptions to organic production standards, which is not in compliance with EU requirements, whilst in other cases (e.g. mutilations) derogations have been granted countrywide without any effective control or verification.

Procedures for communication, co-ordination and co-operation between the CBs and the CCA, and among the different Competent Authorities (CAs), are in place, with the only exception being the French Paying Agency (ASP); with the effect that important information concerning controls carried out by the ASP are not being used to target or prioritise the controls operated by other
CAs.

(Source DG Sanco – FVO website)

Food recall UK – Allergens: Tofutti Original Minis withdrawn for undelcared soya

uk-1

Triano Brands has withdrawn a batch of Tofutti Original Minis with a ‘best before’ date of 15 May 2015 because the product contains soya and this is not mentioned on the front of the packet. This makes the product a possible health risk for those with an allergy or intolerance to soya. Only individual pots with a foil lid mentioning soya as an ingredient are affected.

Product name: Tofutti Original Minis
Pack size: multipack, 6x28g
‘Best before’ date: 15 May 2015

No other Tofutti products are known to be affected.

If you have bought the above product and you have an allergy or intolerance to soya, do not eat it. Instead, return it to the store from where it was bought.

The company has withdrawn the product from sale and will contact the relevant allergy support organisations, which will tell their members about the withdrawal.

(Source: FSA website)

Food recalls in EU – Week 32 – 33

Escherichia_coli_13776880

These weeks on the RASFF database (Rapid Alert System for Food and Feed) we have six recalls from consumers in EU in the alert notifications:

Allergens: undeclared almond in olive with garlic, following company’s own check. Origin Poland, notified by Denmark;

Composition: high content of aluminium in cake flour, following company’s own check. Origin Vietnam, notified by Germany, distributed also to Netherlands and Poland;

Pathogenic micro-organisms: shigatoxin-producing Escherichia Coli in goat cheese made from raw milk, following company’s own check. Origin France, notified by France, distributed also to Belgium and Luxembourg;

Pathogenic micro-organisms: shigatoxin-producing Escherichia Coli in raw goat milk cheese, following company’s own check. Origin France, notified by France, distributed also to Belgium, Germany, Netherlands and Switzerland;

Pathogenic micro-organisms: Salmonella infantis in frozen marinated chicken breast fillets, following an official control on the market. Origin Netherlands, notified by Denmark;

Pathogenic micro-organisms: Salmonella in chorizo, following an official control on the market. Origin Spain, notified by France, distributed also to Luxembourg.

Between the information for attention and the information for follow up notifications, followed by a recall from consumers, we find:

Pathogenic micro-organisms: Bacillus cereus in cream, following company’s own check. Origin United Kingdom, notified by United Kingdom, distributed also to Jersey and Guernsey;

Defective packaging: the lids of the packages does not close tightly in chilled diced bacon, following a consumer complaint. Origin Sweden, notified by Denmark.

Between the alert notifications, followed by a withdrawal from the market of the product, we find:

Allergens: undeclared shrimp in fish stew, following company’s own check. Origin Spain, notified by Italy;

Composition: high content of aluminium in glass noodles from beans, following an official control on the market. Origin China, notified by Germany, distributed also to Austria;

Composition: unauthorised substance androstenedione and unauthorised ingredient tetrahydrocanabinol  in food supplement, following an official control on the market. Origin Germany, notified by Czech Republic;

Composition: unauthorised ingredient tetrahydrocanabinol in food supplement, following an official control on the market. Origin Hungary, notified by Czech Republic;

Mycotoxins: aflatoxins in raw pistachios, following company’s own check. Origin Iran (via Germany), notified by Italy, distributed also to Austria, Hong Kong, France, Malta and Switzerland;

- Pathogenic micro-organisms: Bacillus subtilis in flavoured milk, following a consumer’s complaint. Origin Germany, notified by United Kingdom, distributed also to Austria, Belgium, France, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg and Netherlands;

Pathogenic micro-organisms: Listeria Monocytogenes in frozen meatballs, following company’s own check. Origin Netherlands, notified by Netherlands, distributed also to Belgium;

Pathogenic micro-organisms: Salmonella spp. in ground chilli powder, following an official control on the market. Origin unknown (via Switzerland and Norway), notified by Netherlands, distributed also to Centro African Republic, Gabon, Germany, Italy and Sweden;

Residues of veterinary medicinal products: residue level above MRL for oxytetracycline in frozen beef, following an official control on the market. Origin Poland, notified by Poland, distributed also to Croatia, France, Greece, Hungary, Kosovo, Lithuania, Malta, Montenegro, Poland, Romania, Slovenia, Sweden, United Kingdom, Macedonia.

Amongst border rejections we have

- aflatoxins in peanut kernels, peanuts with shell, groundnut kernels and blanched peanuts from China, in ground nutmeg from the United States, in pistachio nuts from Iran and Tukey;

- Salmonella in raw salted uncalibrated poultry breast, frozen salted poultry breast and frozen salted chicken from Thailand, in hulled sesame seeds from India and in frog legs from Turkey;

- shelled walnuts from Chile and raisins from India infested with moulds;

spoilage of and foreign body (stones, small sticks and stalks, fur) in raisins from Pakistan;

formentanate in fresh peppers from Turkey, endosulfan, cypermethrin and hexaconazole in green beans from the Dominican Republic, chlorpyriphos and diazinon in whole black olives from Egypt

- too high content of sulphite in dried apricot from Uzbekistan;

poor temperature control of and incorrect labelling on frozen Atlantic cod from China and poor temperature control of frozen squid from Argentina;

- prohibited substance nitrofuran (metabolite) furazolidone (AOZ) in frozen raw shrimps from India;

- unauthorised substance sildenafil in food supplements dispatched from China;

attempt to illegally import aubergines from Thailand;

Norovirus in frozen strawberries from China;

poor state of preservation (strong smell) of and rodent excrements in sweet potatoes from Nigeria;

benzo(a)pyrene and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in crude soybean oil and non-refined soybean oil from Ukraine;

- too high content of zinc in vinegar from China;

- unauthorised ingredient (Rauwolfia serpentina, Areca catechu, Sida cordifolia, Ipomoea turphetum) and novel food ingredient Mucuna pruriens in various food supplements from India.

For feed, we have an alert notification, followed by a withdrawal from the market:

Biotoxins: meadow saffron (Colchicum autumnale) in hay, following company’s own check. Origin Germany, notified by Netherlands.

For food contact materials we have an alert notification, followed by a withdrawal from the market:

- Migration of p-tert-butylbenzoic acid (PTBBA) in plastic bags containing candy blood, following a consumer complaint. Origin China (via United Kingdom), notified by Germany;

and border rejections for migration of nickel and of manganese from grill and drip pans from Turkey and biodegradable plates from China unfit for use as food contact material (does not match conditions of use >100°C as on the label).

Related articles

Latest Food recalls in Canada – Allergens

eggs

Food Recall Warning (Allergen) – Kaak brand Crispy Baked Bread recalled due to undeclared sesame

Recall date: August 15, 2014
Reason for recall: Allergen – Sesame Seeds
Hazard classification: Class 2
Company / Firm: Salem Brothers
Distribution: Alberta, Manitoba, Nova Scotia, Ontario, Saskatchewan
Extent of the distribution: Retail 
Reference number: 9158
Recalled products

Brand Name Common Name Size Code(s) on Product UPC
Kaak Crispy Baked Bread (Plain) 350g All codes where sesame is not declared on the label. 5 285000 599098
Kaak Crispy Baked Bread (Anis Seed) 350g All codes where sesame is not declared on the label. 5 285000 599098
Kaak Crispy Baked Bread (Black Seed) 350g All codes where sesame is not declared on the label. 5 285000 599098

 

Food Recall Warning (Allergen) – Chicken Burgers recalled due to undeclared egg

Recall date: August 15, 2014
Reason for recall: Allergen – Egg
Hazard classification: Class 2
Company / Firm: Kent Heritage Farm
Distribution: Ontario
Extent of the distribution: Consumer
Reference number: 9157
Recalled products

Brand Name Common Name Size Code(s) on Product UPC Additional Info
None Chicken Burgers 2.27kg All codes where egg is not declared on the label. N/A Product sold through direct home sales.

(Source: CFIA website)

Food Recall in US – Allergens – LEAN CUISINE® Culinary Collection Chicken with Peanut Sauce

Shelled-Fresh-Shrimps

Recall Due to Package Mislabeling

Nestlé Prepared Foods Company Announces Allergy Alert and Voluntary Recall Of LEAN CUISINE® Culinary Collection Chicken with Peanut Sauce

August 22, 2014 – Nestlé Prepared Foods Company, a business unit of Nestlé USA, is initiating the voluntary recall of a limited quantity of LEAN CUISINE® Culinary Collection Chicken with Peanut Sauce/UPC code 13800 10154 because it may contain undeclared shrimp. People who have an allergy or severe sensitivity to shrimp run the risk of serious or life-threatening allergic reaction if they consume these products.

The affected product is marked with a production code of 4165595911U and has a “best before” date of JULY 2015. A small quantity of LEAN CUISINE Culinary Collection Shrimp Alfredo was inadvertently placed into packaging for LEAN CUISINE Culinary Collection Chicken with Peanut Sauce.

Three consumers who purchased the mislabeled product alerted Nestlé to this issue. To date, no illnesses or allergic reactions have been reported. Nestlé issued this voluntary recall of one hour code of production to ensure the safety of consumers with shellfish allergies.

Consumers who may have purchased LEAN CUISINE Culinary Collection Chicken with Peanut Sauce /UPC code 13800 10154should look for the manufacturing code, located in the grey box, on the right side panel of the package. The manufacturing code of the recalled product is: 4165595911U. No other LEAN CUISINE items are impacted by this recall. The affected product was distributed to retail customers in Washington State, California, Louisiana and Texas, and can be found in the frozen food aisle. Nestlé asks consumers to contact us for a full refund by calling Nestlé Consumer Services directly at 1-800-392-4057 Monday through Friday from 8:00 AM to 8:00 PM EST.

The quality and safety of our products are the top priority for our company. For these reasons, the company initiated this recall. We apologize to our retail customers and consumers and sincerely regret any inconvenience created by this product recall. We have advised the U. S. Food & Drug Administration and the U.S. Department of Agriculture of this voluntary recall and will cooperate with them fully.

Contact:
Consumer:
1-800-392-4057

Media:
Roz O’Hearn, Nestlé USA:
(440) 264-5170
Roz.OHearn@us.nestle.com

Edie Burge, Nestlé USA
(818) 551-3284
Edie.Burge@us.nestle.com

(Source: FDA website. No copyright claim is made for portions of this blog and linked items that are works of the United States Government, state governments or third parties.)

EU to ease import conditions for sunflower oil from Ukraine

Sunflower-Oil1

“Today I publish another article of my friend and food lawyer in Lisbon, Francesco Montanari, written in cooperation with his colleague Veronika Jèzso; thank you both for this and for your great expertise on food import requirements”.

Early in July this year the European Commission in agreement with Member States decided to relax special imports conditions currently applicable to sunflower oil originating from Ukraine.  Import conditions are currently set out in Regulation (EC) No 1151/2009. By adopting Regulation (EU) No 853/2014, the Commission has formally repealed the existing emergency measures with effect as of 26 August 2014.

According to the Commission, the decision of easing the level of import surveillance on sunflower oil from Ukraine is justified by the absence of notifications reported through the Rapid Alert System for Feed and Food (RASFF) over the past few years. This decision is, however, also politically motivated in that it aims at reducing pressure on the trade and the economy of a country that is experiencing considerable turmoil and instability.

With special import conditions poised to be lifted, sunflower oil from Ukraine will be subjected to the general EU import regime for food of non-animal origin as designed by Article 15 (1) Regulation (EC) No 882/2004.  This means that national enforcement authorities will still be able to target consignments of Ukrainian sunflower oil in the context of routine checks at EU borders or in the market.

The following paragraphs provides a brief account of a) the events that led to the adoption of EU emergency measures concerning the imports in question as well as of b) the import procedures that had to be followed till recently.

a) Contamination of sunflower oil with mineral oil

Paraffin oils are petroleum products used in a variety of industry sectors ranging from food production to pharmaceuticals, cosmetics and engineering. Liquid paraffin, also known as ‘mineral oil’, is an odourless and colourless substance of relatively low value  mainly used for preventing water absorption. Paraffin oil is harmful if swallowed or inhaled.

Back in April 2008, the European Commission was notified information through the RASFF of a case of sunflower oil from Ukraine presenting high levels of mineral oil. Consulted on the potential risks ensuing from the contamination, the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) pointed out that, taking into account human exposure estimates and the fact that the analysis detected a mineral oil of a high viscosity type, exposure levels, although undesirable, did not constitute a health concern.  Nevertheless, given that the source of contamination could not be identified with certainty, competent authorities in Member States ordered the withdrawal from the market of contaminated sunflower oil and other food containing it.

At EU level, the European Commission introduced interim protection measures through Decision 2008/388/EC, in order to ensure that no exports of sunflower oil reached the EU without being adequately certified and controlled.  Decision 2008/433/EC later confirmed the interim protection measures.

The Food Veterinary Office (FVO) conducted an audit in September 2008, in order to assess the official control system in place in Ukraine. The FVO team found that the Ukrainian authorities had undertaken adequate measures to prevent the contamination of sunflower oil destined to EU import. Yet, investigations carried out by the Ukrainian authorities could not reveal the source of the contamination, mainly because of lack of official sampling and subsequent follow-up. In order to ensure performance of sampling in accordance with the relevant EU provisions (i.e. Regulation (EC) No 333/2007), Regulation 1151/2009 was eventually adopted.

b) Import procedures under Regulation 1151/2009

Applicable as of January 2010, Regulation 1151/2009 applies to crude and refined sunflower seed oil originating or consigned from Ukraine (Article 1). Sunflower oil for EU import must not contain more than 50 mg/kg mineral paraffin (Article 3).

Each consignment of sunflower oil destined for EU import must be accompanied by:

a) a health certificate attesting that the product does not contain more than 50 mg/kg mineral paraffin, and

b) an analytical report, which, issued by an accredited laboratory, indicates the results of sampling and analysis for the presence of mineral oil, the measurement uncertainty of the analytical result, as well as the limits of detection and quantification of the analytical method.

Both documents must be duly signed by an authorised representative of the Ministry of Health of Ukraine.

Furthermore, business operators must give prior notification to the first point of entry in the EU, specifying estimated date and time of arrival of the consignment (Article 3).

In terms of control activities, competent authorities in Member States must check that all incoming consignments intended for import are accompanied by the required documents. In order to ensure that relevant products do not contain unacceptable levels of mineral paraffin, national enforcement authorities are as well required to carry out physical inspections, including sampling and analysis, on a random basis (Article 4).

Food recall in Australia – Raw apricot kernels for hydrocyanic acid

apricot kernels

Newstart Heath Supplies has recalled Aprisnax Australian Raw Apricot Kernels from their online store and health food stores nationally, due to high levels of hydrocyanic acid. Food products containing high levels of hydrocyanic acid may cause illness if consumed. Consumers should not eat this product and should return it to the place of purchase for a full refund. Any consumers concerned about their health should seek medical advice.

Date notified to FSANZ: 20/08/2014

Food type: Raw apricot kernels from apricot seeds

Product name: Aprisnax Australian Raw Apricot Kernels

Package description and size: Black Food-grade stand-up pouch, shelf stable – 1kg

Date marking: Best Before NOV 2015

Country of origin: Australia

Reason for recall: High levels of hydrocyanic acid

Distribution: The product has been sold via their online store (www.oznatureshop.com.au) and health food stores nationally

Contact: Newstart Heath Supplies, 0414 493 121, www.oznatureshop.com.au

(Source: FSANZ website)

Food recall in UK – Oaty Muesli – Allergens (almonds – hazelnuts)

??????

Sainsbury’s Freefrom Oaty Muesli recalled today because a limited number of packets may contain almonds and hazelnuts, which are not declared on the label.

Product name: Sainsbury’s Freefrom Oaty Muesli
Pack size: 500g
‘Best before’ date: 17 December 2014

No other Sainsbury’s products are known to be affected.

If you have bought the above product and are allergic to almonds and/or hazelnuts, do not eat it. Instead, return it to the nearest Sainsbury’s store for a full refund.

Sainsbury’s has recalled the above product from sale. Point-of-sale notices have been displayed in stores. In addition, the company has contacted the relevant allergy support organisations which will inform their at-risk members of the recall.

(Source: FSA UK website)

Written Q&A to EU Commission – Mangoes import ban from India

mango

Question for written answer
to the Commission
Glenis Willmott (S&D)

Subject: Mango ban

In March 2014 the European Union banned imports of mangoes (and some other produce) from India. The ban came into force at the beginning of May, coinciding with the high season for the mangoes. The ban was proposed because the fruit was repeatedly found to be infested with pests, despite previous warnings that plant health measures had to be improved.

My region of the East Midlands of England is particularly affected by the ban, due to our strong links with India. Of course restricting invasive pests is vital, as they can cause a huge number of problems. However we must also consider the important economic consequences of imposing a lengthy ban.

The ban will be reviewed before December 2015. What measures are being taken to ensure that India improves phytosanitary measures as soon as possible? Does the Commission take the view that a decision could be taken any sooner, so that the ban could be lifted in time for next year’s high season?

Answer given by Mr Borg on behalf of the Commission (7th August 2014)

The Honorable Member will be aware that India accounts for the highest number, by far, of interceptions of harmful organisms from any country exporting plants and plant products to the European Union, despite the relatively low volume of trade.

This situation has continued despite communication and technical exchanges with the competent authorities of India. Failure to act led to the necessary adoption of temporary emergency measures prohibiting the import of the most high-risk commodities from India to protect the Union’s plant health status.

India has recently strengthened export checks on plants and plant products that could guarantee compliance with EU import requirements for plant health. While these steps seem to be going in the right direction, the EU measures will only be reviewed once compliance of Indian exports with international and EU requirements are in evidence. At this stage, it is to the competent authorities of India to act and propose the EU satisfactory guarantees that would allow reconsidering trade of safe commodities to resume.

(Source: EU Parliament)

Food recalls in EU – Week 31 – 2014

Coulommiers_lait_cru

This week on the RASFF database (Rapid Alert System for Food and Feed) we have six recalls from consumers in EU in the alert notifications:

Allergens: undeclared wheat in liquorice, following a consumer complaint. Origin Spain, relabelled in Denmark, notified by Denmark and distributed also to Germany;

Foreign bodies: glass fragments in dry sausages, following a consumer complaint. Origin France, notified by France, distributed also to Slovenia;

Pathogenic micro-organisms: Listeria Monocytogenes in chilled smoked trout, following company’s own check. Origin Spain, notified by France;

Pathogenic micro-organisms: Listeria Monocytogenes in gorgonzola, following company’s own check. Origin Italy, notified by  France, distributed also to Denmark and Germany;

Pathogenic micro-organisms: shigatoxin-producing Escherichia Coli in cow’s milk cheese made with raw milk, following company’s own check. Origin France, notified by France, distributed also to Austria, Belgium, Canada, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Germany, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Romania, Slovenia, Sweden, Switzerland and United Kingdom;

Pesticide residues: dimethoate in fresh green celery, following an official control on the market. Origin Belgium, notified by Belgium, distributed also to Luxembourg and France.

Between the information for attention notifications, followed by a recall from consumers, we find:

Food additives and flavourings: too high content of  E210 – benzoic acid in soft drink, following an official control on the market. Origin Vietnam, notified by Denmark;

Pesticide residues: carbendazim in courgettes, following an official control on the market. Origin Jordan, notified by Denmark.

Between the alert notifications, followed by a withdrawal from the market of the product, we find:

Composition: unauthorised substance progesterone in food supplement, following an official control on the market. Origin Czech Republic, notified by Czech Republic, distributed also to Austria, Bulgaria, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, Moldova, Slovakia and Slovenia;

Composition: unauthorised ingredient (androgenic anabolic steroid) in food supplement, following an official control on the market. Origin Bulgaria, notified by Czech Republic;

Industrial contaminants: benzo(a)pyrene and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in cocoa bean powder, following an official control on the market. Origin Spain, notified by Slovakia;

Mycotoxins: Ochratoxin A in organic bread, following company’s own check. Origin Germany, notified by Germany, distributed also to Austria, France, Italy, Lithuania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Switzerland and United Kingdom;

Pathogenic micro-organisms: Salmonella spp. in Asian assortment, following company’s own check. Origin France, notified by Belgium, distributed also to Luxembourg;

Pathogenic micro-organisms: Salmonella in madras curry powder, following company’s own check. Origin Belgium, notified by United Kingdom;

Pathogenic micro-organisms: foodborne outbreak suspected (Salmonella enteritidis) to be caused by eggs, following food poisoning. Origin Germany, notified by France;

Pesticide residues: tebuconazole and trifloxystrobin in mangoes, following company’s own check. Origin Pakistan, notified by Belgium, distributed also to Germany, Iceland, Italy and Netherlands.

Amongst border rejections we have Salmonella in frozen boneless skinless marinated chicken inner fillets, frozen salted chicken innerfillets, frozen spiced turkey medallions, frozen turkey and poultry meat preparation from Brazil, unauthorised substance dichlorvos, cypermethrin and chlorpyriphos in dried oloyin beans from Nigeria, attempt to illegally import paan leaves from Bangladesh and melon seeds and dried beans from Nigeria, aflatoxins in peanuts, nutmeg powder, crushed chillies, chilli peppers and fried coated groundnuts from India, in blanched peanuts from China, in pistachios from Iran, in shelled pistachio kernels from Iran (via Turkey), in groundnuts in shell from Egypt and in apricot kernels from Tajikistan (via Turkey), high bacterial count in and spoilage of sheep casings from Pakistan, live insects in cinnamon from Indonesia infested with moulds, chlorpyriphos in chilled asparagus peas from the Dominican Republic, methamidophos in green beans from Kenya, malathion in fresh peppers from Turkey, too high content of sulphite in dried pineapple and mango bites from Philippines, dimethoate in mangetout peas from Kenya, methamidophos and acephate in French beans with pods from Kenya, chlorfenapyr in papaya from Brazil, unauthorised substance carbofuran in peppers from the Dominican Republic, unauthorised substances sildenafil and tadalafil in food supplement dispatched from China, buprofezin, triazophos and imidacloprid in tea from China and anthraquinone and unauthorised substance dicrotophos in tea from China, via Hong Kong.

For feed, we have an information for follow up notification, followed by a recall from consumers:

- Composition: too high content of hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) in complementary feed for honeybees, following an official control on the market. Origin Germany, notified by Belgium.

For food contact materials we have border rejections for migration of manganese from egg beaters and of chromium and nickel from wine stopper from China.

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