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Recent FVO report on bivalve molluscs and fishery products

vongole

Recently the Food Veterinary Office (FVO) spotted some problems regarding live bivalve molluscs in Greece and fishery products from Bangladesh.

GREECE – Live bivalve molluscs

The first report describes the outcome of a Food and Veterinary Office audit in Greece carried out from 14 to 24 October 2014, as part of its programme of audits for 2014.

The primary objectives of the audit were to assess whether the official controls of bivalve molluscs, echinoderms, tunicates and marine gastropods are organised and carried out in accordance with the relevant provisions of Regulation (EC) No 882/2004 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 29 April 2004 on official controls performed to ensure the verification of compliance with feed and food law, animal health and animal welfare rules and whether the control system in place for the production and placing on the market of bivalve molluscs, echinoderms, tunicates and marine gastropods is in compliance with European Union requirements.

The audit also verified the implementation of the recommendations of the previous 2011 Food and Veterinary Office audit visit covering the same subject.

The current report concludes that considerable improvements have been made since the previous audit, however, the official control system in place covering live bivalve molluscs cannot yet be considered as fully in compliance with all European Union requirements. Important shortcomings are still present, notably related to the definition of sampling points for the collection of water for phytoplankton testing and live bivalve molluscs for biotoxins testing, the frequency of monitoring/testing of live bivalve molluscs for one group of toxins (Paralytic Shellfish Poison) and the absence of demonstration of the efficiency of the purification systems.

Of the twenty recommendations of the 2011 audit, ten can be considered as addressed, three partially addressed, six not addressed (monitoring of biotoxins (for Paralytic Shellfish Poison); decisions taken after monitoring; additional monitoring requirements; purification centres; analytical and legal validity of samples; coordination between Competent Authorities) and one is no longer applicable.

BANGLADESH – Fishery products

This report describes the outcome of a Food and Veterinary Office audit in Bangladesh carried out from20 to 30 April 2015, as part of its programme of audits in third countries.

The objectives of the audit were to evaluate whether the official controls put in place by the competent authority can guarantee that conditions of production of fishery products in Bangladesh destined for export to the EU are in line with the requirements laid down in EU legislation and in particular with health attestations contained in the certificate and to verify the extent to which the guarantees and corrective actions submitted to the Commission services in response to the recommendations of the previous Food and Veterinary Office fishery products report of 2010 have been implemented and enforced by the competent authority.

The report concludes that improvements have been made since the last audit and in principle, the current organisation of the competent authority and its documented operational procedures provide for an acceptable official control system for fishery products which is implemented in a satisfactory way.

However, certain deficiencies in their implementation (i.e. temperature controls, structural standards of freezer vessels; lack of histamine, dioxin/PCBs and additives testing; maximum limits for cadmium) do not offer the necessary guarantees that fishery products intended for EU export fully respect the requirements defined in the health certificate for imports of fishery products intended for human consumption as set out in the model defined in Regulation (EC) No 2074/2005.

Food recalls in EU – Week 31/2015

ListeriaMonocytogenes

This week on the EU RASFF (Rapid Alert System for Food and Feed) we can find the following notifications:

1. Alerts followed by a recall from consumers:

Foreign bodies: plastic fragments (1×1 cm) in chilled soups from Ireland, following a consumer complaint. Notified by Ireland, distributed also to United Kingdom;

– FCM (Food Contact Materials). Heavy metals: migration of nickel (1.43 mg/kg – ppm) from barbecue cutlery from China, following an official control on the market. Notified by Germany, distributed also to Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Greece, Italy, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden and Switzerland;

– FCM (Food Contact Materials). Industrial contaminants: migration of formaldehyde (16.2 mg/kg – ppm) and of melamine (3.7 mg/kg – ppm) from children decorated melamine plates from China, following an official control on the market. Notified from France, distributed also to Belgium, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Spain and Taiwan;

– Pathogenic micro-organisms: enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (VTEC O26 vt1) in raw cow’s milk cheese from Ireland, following a consumer complaint. Notified by Ireland, distributed also to United Kingdom;

– Pathogenic micro-organisms: Listeria monocytogenes (16000 CFU/g) in gorgonzola from Italy, following an official control on the market. Notified by Austria, distributed also to France and Germany;

– Pathogenic micro-organisms: Listeria monocytogenes (260 CFU/g) in dry ham from France, following company’s own check. Notified from France, distributed also to Belgium;

– Pathogenic micro-organisms: Listeria monocytogenes (< 10 CFU/g) in jambon from Spain, following company’s own check. Notified by France.

2. Information for attention/for follow up followed by a recall from consumers:

– FCM (Food Contact Materials): migration of cadmium (31.46 mg/item) and of lead (352.46 mg/item) from drinking glasses from China, via the United Arab Emirates. Notified by Cyprus;

– Pathogenic micro-organisms: Listeria monocytogenes (>15000 CFU/g) in andouille sausages from France, following company’s own check. Notified by France, distributed also to Belgium, Czech Republic, Germany, Netherlands, South Africa and United Kingdom.

3. Alerts followed by a withdrawal from the market:

– FCM (Food Contact Materials). Industrial contaminants: migration of melamine (4.4 mg/kg – ppm) from children decorated melamine plates from China, via the Netherlands, following an official control on the market. Notified by Belgium;

– Mycotoxins: aflatoxins (B1 = 126 µg/kg – ppb) in almonds from the Netherlands, following an official control on the market. Notified by Belgium;

– Pathogenic micro-organisms: Salmonella typhimurium (presence/25g) in frozen chicken leg quarters from the Netherlands, following an official control on the market. Notified by Malta, distributed also to Belgium, Benin, Congo (Brazzaville), Czech Republic, Gabon, Germany, Mauritania, Montenegro, Morocco, Togo and United Kingdom;

4. Seizures:

None.

5. Border rejections:

  • acephate (0.022 mg/kg – ppm) in basmati rice from India
  • acetamiprid (0.16 mg/kg – ppm), thiamethoxam (0.12 mg/kg – ppm) and imidacloprid (0.16 mg/kg – ppm) and unauthorised substances profenofos (0.16 mg/kg – ppm) and carbendazim (0.30 mg/kg – ppm) in cumin seeds from India
  • acetamiprid (0.81 mg/kg – ppm) in habanero hot peppers from the Dominican Republic
  • aflatoxins (B1 = 7.2 µg/kg – ppb) in blanched groundnut kernels from China
  • cypermethrin (1.5 mg/kg – ppm), quinalphos (1.1 mg/kg – ppm), lambda-cyhalothrin (0.98 mg/kg – ppm), imidacloprid (0.22 mg/kg – ppm) and fipronil (0.086 mg/kg – ppm) and unauthorised substance carbendazim (0.97 mg/kg – ppm) in green cardamon from India
  • fipronil (0.013 mg/kg – ppm) in chilli peppers from the Dominican Republic
  • methamidophos (0.3 mg/kg – ppm) in green beans from Kenya
  • FCM (Food Contact Materials) migration of chromium (4.4-17.2 mg/kg – ppm) and too high level of overall migration (37-144 mg/dm²) from knives set with cutting board from China
  • FCM (Food Contact Materials) migration of chromium (up to 0.8 mg/kg – ppm) from stainless steel basket for vegetable steam-cooking from China
  • poor temperature control (between -8.4 and -11.1 °C) of frozen tuna loins (Thunnus albacares) from Cape Verde
  • prohibited substance nitrofuran (metabolite) furazolidone (AOZ) (2.8 µg/kg – ppb) in frozen tiger prawns (Penaeus monodon) from India
  • Salmonella Kristianstad (presence /25g) and Salmonella Montevideo (presence /25g) in hulled sesame seeds from India
  • Salmonella spp. (in 1 out of 5 samples /25g) in auto dried hulled sesame seeds and hulled sesame seeds from India
  • unauthorised substance anthraquinone (0.41 mg/kg – ppm) in black cardamon from India
  • unauthorised substance carbendazim (0.45 mg/kg – ppm) in fresh beans with pods from Kenya
  • unauthorised substance chlorfenapyr (0.02 mg/kg – ppm) in papayas from Brazil
  • unauthorised substance ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) in sparkling citrus drink from the Philippines
  • unauthorised substance profenofos (0.091 mg/kg – ppm) in pitted olives in brine from Egypt

FVO report – India – Microbiological contamination in seeds for human consumption

Lentil Sprouts

This report describes the outcome of an audit carried out by the Food and Veterinary Office (FVO) in India from 9 to 17 December 2014. The objectives of the audit were to evaluate the control systems in place to control microbiological contamination in seeds for human consumption (in particular Salmonella contamination of sesame seeds as well as seeds for sprouting e.g mung beans and other seeds for sprouting) intended for export to the European Union (EU) in the framework of Regulations (EC) No 178/2002 and No 852/2004. The evaluation of procedures in place for certification for imports into the EU of seeds for the production of sprouts as required by Regulation (EU) No 211/2013 was also assessed.

This FVO audit to India on the microbiological controls of sesame seeds was undertaken as part of the 2014 FVO audit programme due to the number of Rapid Alert System for Food and Feed (RASFF) notifications linked to this issue.

There is no requirement for exporters of sesame seeds to the EU to be registered with the Shellac and Forest Products Export Promotion Council (SHEFEXIL), the competent authority responsible for sesame seeds. A number of exporters who were mentioned in RASFF notifications were not members of SHEFEXIL and could not be followed up by SHEFEXIL.

A number of consignments that were tested and found to be Salmonella and E. coli free prior to shipment from India were found to be Salmonella positive in the EU.

Overall, there are a number of significant gaps in existence which cannot assure that sesame seeds exported to the EU are safe. The CA responsible for sesame seeds, SHEFEXIL, does not carry out any controls on growers, processors or exporters of sesame seed. In addition, there is a failure to follow up RASFF notifications relating to sesame seeds in India. This is mainly due to a lack of coordination between the Ministry of Commerce and Industry which is the national contact point for RASFF in India and SHEFEXIL, which is responsible for following up on RASFF notifications relating to sesame seeds. Laboratories visited were capable of undertaking the relevant testing for Salmonella detection. However, the approach to sampling of consignments for microbiological testing prior to export could not ensure statistical representativeness.

The Agricultural and Processed Food Products Export Development Authority (APEDA) confirmed that they are the CA for sprouted seeds and seeds for sprouting. APEDA is aware of the certification requirements for imports into the EU of sprouts and seeds intended for the production of sprouts as required by Regulation (EU) No 211/2013. APEDA has received no requests from exporters for such certification to date, thus no certificates have been issued.

Hinoman’s Vegetable Whole-protein Ingredient Granted GRAS Status

Hinoman's Vegetable Whole-protein Ingredient Granted GRAS Status

Hinoman, Ltd., has been granted self-affirmed GRAS (Generally Recognized as Safe) status for its Mankai, a vegetable whole-protein ingredient with high nutritional value. The announcement was made during the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) conference in Chicago, July 12-14.

The GRAS designation is for the use of Mankai in functional foods and beverages, and was confirmed based on scientific methods, as well as corroborated by extensive history of use in Asia Pacific. The status was endorsed by a third party-appointed panel composed of some of the top food toxicologists in the U.S. This approval clearly demonstrates Mankai’s preeminence in tests of food safety and purity.

The nutritional composition of the Mankai microgreen ingredient has been determined to be high in protein (at least 45-48%), low in fat (7-8%), with 24-45% carbohydrate content. Analysis of the amino acid composition reveals the protein to be a rich source of the entire group of essential amino acids.

“GRAS approval of the Mankai high-protein ingredient is a major step toward Hinoman becoming a key microgreen protein supplier in the U.S. market,” says Udi Alroy, VP of Marketing and Business Development for Hinoman. “Hinoman’s proprietary cultivation platform makes Mankai a reliable, sustainable food source for large-scale growth and consumption.”

Mankai is produced in an advanced hydroponic system that optimizes yield throughout the year. This precisely regulated aquaculture platform is highly controlled, operating under remote cultivation management and regulation. As a result, it ensures plant purity so that Mankai is clean and free from all pesticides and heavy metals, to a level that exceeds nutritional grade.

“The proprietary Hinoman technology enables strict standards of food safety and security, and both are critical to ensure a sustainable supply chain,” explains Ron Salpeter, CEO for Hinoman. “The system addresses the challenges of future agriculture and nutrition needs with simplicity and sustainability, providing a comprehensive, plant-derived whole-protein food solution.”

Food recalls in EU – Week 29-30/2015

Merguez_grilled

This week on the EU RASFF (Rapid Alert System for Food and Feed) we can find the following notifications:

1. Alerts followed by a recall from consumers:

– Allergens: undeclared mustard in cooked Lyoner sausage from Germany, following an official control on the market. Notified by Germany, distributed also to France, Ireland and Netherlands;

– Pathogenic micro-organisms: Salmonella spp. (presence/25g) in smoked ham from Germany, following company’s own check. Notified by France;

– Pathogenic micro-organisms: Salmonella typhimurium (presence/10g) in merguez – sausages from France, following company’s own check. Notified by France, distributed also to Austria and Germany;

– Pesticide residues: methomyl (0.32 mg/kg – ppm) in grapes from Egypt, via the Netherlands, following an official control on the market. notified by Denmark.

2. Information for attention/for follow up followed by a recall from consumers:

– Aflatoxins: ochratoxin A (28 µg/kg – ppb) in organic seedless raisins with oil from Australia, following company’s own check. Notified by Denmark;

– Non pathogenic micro-organisms: bacterial growth in dressing from Sweden, following a consumer complaint. Notified by Denmark, distributed also to Iceland;

– Non pathogenic micro-organisms: naan bread from the United Kingdom infested with mouldsfollowing company’s own check. Notified by Denmark, distributed also to Iceland;

– Non pathogenic micro-organisms: liver pate from Germany infested with moulds (Penicillium and Rhizopus), following an official control on the market. Notified by Slovakia;

– Residues of medicinal veterinary products: prohibited substance nitrofuran (metabolite) furazolidone (AOZ) (4.9 µg/kg – ppb) in frozen king prawns from Vietnam, following an official control on the market. Notified by Germany.

3. Alerts followed by a withdrawal from the market:

– Allergens: undeclared peanut in dried fruits with chocolate from the Netherlands, following a consumer complaint. Notified by Netherlands, distributed also to Belgium, France, Germany and Serbia;

– Allergens: undeclared gluten and fish in Worcester sauce from the United Kingdom, following a consumer complaint. Notified by Ireland;

– Allergens: undeclared sulphite in Norway lobster (Nephrops norvegicus) from Croatia, following an official control on the market. Notified from Italy;

– Allergens: undeclared egg (>2.5 mg/kg – ppm) in fish cutlets from the Netherlands, following an official control on the market. Notified by Italy;

– Composition: too high content of vitamin B6 (1.82 g/100g) in food supplement from unknown origin, via the Netherlands, following an official control on the market. Notified by France;

– Composition: too high content of vitamin B6 in food supplement from Belgium, following an official control on the market. Notified by Sweden, distributed also to United Kingdom;

– Composition: high content of Senna alexandrina Mill. in herbal infusion from Thailand, via the Netherlands, following an official control on the market. Notified by Denmark, distributed also to Austria, Belgium, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Luxembourg, Malta, Spain and Sweden;

– FCM (Food Contact Materials): migration of formaldehyde (346 mg/kg – ppm) from melamine bowls from China, via Spain, following an official control on the market. Notified by France;

Heavy metals: mercury (1.29; 1.8 mg/kg – ppm) in frozen blue shark (Prionace glauca) from Spain, following an official control on the market. Notified by Spain, distributed also to Portugal;

– Industrial contaminants: dioxins (3.44; 4.06; 3.88; 2.84; 3.39; pg WHO TEQ/g) in organic eggs from the Netherlands, following an official control on the market. Notified by Netherlands, distributed also to Belgium and France;

– Mycotoxins: ochratoxin A (11.83 µg/kg – ppb) in raisins from Chile, via Argentina and via the Czech Republic, following an official control on the market. Notified by Slovakia;

– Pesticide residues: ethylene oxide (2.5 mg/kg – ppm) in black pepper from Vietnam, following company’s own check. Notified by Netherlands, distributed also to Belgium, Brazil, Finland, France, Germany, Mexico, Poland, Singapore, Switzerland, and United States.

4. Seizures:

In Italy we had a seizure for aflatoxins (B1 = 19 µg/kg – ppb) in pistachios from Iran, via Germany, following an official control on the market.

5. Border rejections:

  • aflatoxins (B1 = 7.8; Tot. = 8.5 µg/kg – ppb) in peanuts in shell, shelled peanuts (B1 = 9.5; Tot. = 11 µg/kg – ppb) and peanut powder (B1 = 9.9; Tot. = 24.9 / B1 = 13.1; Tot. = 28.8 µg/kg – ppb) from China
  • aflatoxins (B1 = 16.1; Tot. = 17.2 µg/kg – ppb) in whole stemless chilli from India
  • aflatoxins (B1 = 16.4; Tot. = 46.7 µg/kg – ppb) and ochratoxin A (92.5 µg/kg – ppb) in spiced red pepper powder from Ethiopia
  • aflatoxins (B1 = 22.03; Tot. = 44.45 µg/kg – ppb) in roasted red inside pistachio nuts from Turkey
  • aflatoxins (B1 = 6.9; Tot. = 7.3 µg/kg – ppb) in groundnuts in shell from Egypt
  • aflatoxins (B1 = 8.1; Tot. = 8.6 µg/kg – ppb) in shelled peanuts from the United States
  • absence of health certificate(s) for curry leaves from India and for watermelon seeds from Nigeria
  • attempt to illegally import fresh mint from Vietnam
  • biphenyl (0.12 mg/kg – ppm) in fermented tea from China
  • cadmium (2.99 mg/kg – ppm) in frozen squid (loligo spp) from Yemen
  • chlorpyrifos (0.03 mg/kg – ppm), cypermethrin (0.86 mg/kg – ppm) and dimethoate (0.038 mg/kg – ppm) and unauthorised substances dichlorvos (6.3 mg/kg – ppm) and trichlorfon (8.4 mg/kg – ppm) in brown beans from Nigeria
  • chlorpyrifos (0.52 mg/kg – ppm) and unauthorised substance chlorfenapyr (0.04 mg/kg – ppm) in chinese brocoli from China
  • dodine (0.18 mg/kg – ppm) in red cherry peppers in brine and hot peppers in brine (0.13 mg/kg – ppm) from Egypt
  • dodine (0.30 mg/kg – ppm) and unauthorised substance carbendazim (0.38 mg/kg – ppm) in red cherry pepper in brine (Capsicum annuum) from Egypt
  • difenoconazole (0.22 mg/kg – ppm) in fresh mangoes from Brazil
  • FCM: migration of chromium (1 mg/l) and too high level of overall migration (29 mg/dm²) from stainless steel knives from China
  • FCM: migration of chromium (3.5 mg/l) and too high level of overall migration (14 mg/dm²) from stainless knives from China
  • FCM: migration of chromium (0.8 mg) from steel fish tong from China
  • formetanate (0.180 mg/kg – ppm) in sweet peppers and fresh peppers (0.03 mg/kg – ppm) from Turkey
  • fraudulent health certificate(s) for groundnuts and shelled groundnuts from China
  • Listeria monocytogenes (presence /25g) in frozen surimi (Nemipterus spp) from Thailand
  • mercury (2.889; 2.659; 2.734; 2.751; 1.270; 1.374; 1.277; 1.267 mg/kg – ppm) in chilled swordfish (Xiphias gladius) from Ecuador
  • methamidophos (0.244 mg/kg – ppm) in fresh peppers from Turkey and in green beans with pods (0.067 mg/kg – ppm) from Kenya
  • mercury (0.90 mg/kg – ppm) in red porgy (Pagrus pagrus) from Morocco
  • poor temperature control ( >-5 °C) of frozen cod portions and fillets (Gadus macrocephalus) from China, of of frozen red salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) (-3.4, -4.6, -3.2, -3.6 °C) from the United States and of frozen squisds (Illex spp) (-2.1 °C) from Argentina
  • Salmonella (present /25g) in frozen poultry meat preparation from Thailand
  • Salmonella spp. (presence /25g) in paan leaves and betel leaves from India
  • Salmonella spp. (presence /25g) in frozen salted skinless boneless chicken breasts and frozen salted chicken (presence/25g) from Thailand
  • too high content of sulphite (2685 mg/kg – ppm) in dried apricots from Turkey
  • unauthorised colour Sudan 4 (1.0 mg/kg – ppm) in palm oil from Nigeria
  • unauthorised substance carbofuran (0.16 mg/kg – ppm) in yardlong bean from the Dominican Republic
  • unauthorised substance carbendazim (1.4 mg/kg – ppm) in dragon fruit from Thailand
  • unauthorised substance permethrin (0.23 mg/kg – ppm) in dragon fruit from Vietnam
  • unauthorised placing on the market (Anacylus pyrethrum, contains L-leucine, L-isoleucine and L-valine as BCAAs) of, unauthorised novel food ingredient Dendrobium nobile, novel food ingredient Eurycoma longifolia and novel food ingredient Mucuna pruriens and unauthorised substances vanadium and arginine alphaketoglutarate in food supplements from the United States
  • undeclared peanut in sesame paste from China

FDA revises proposed Nutrition Facts label rule to include a daily value for added sugars

Sugar-Cubes-Minor-Crop-796x1024

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today proposed including the percent daily value (%DV) for added sugars on the Nutrition Facts label of packaged foods, giving consumers additional information for added sugars similar to information they have seen for decades with respect to nutrients such as sodium and certain fats. The percent daily value indicates how much a nutrient in a serving of food contributes to a daily diet and would help consumers make informed choices for themselves and their families. The percent daily value would be based on the recommendation that the daily intake of calories from added sugars not exceed 10 percent of total calories.

The proposed rule is a supplement to the March 3, 2014 proposed rule on updating the Nutrition Facts label, under which the FDA proposed that food companies include added sugars on the Nutrition Facts label. The proposed rule did not include the declaration of the percent daily value for added sugars.

The 2015 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee (DGAC) recently summarized scientific data related to added sugars. The FDA considered the scientific evidence that the DGAC used, which showed that it is difficult to meet nutrient needs while staying within calorie requirements if one exceeds 10 percent of total calories from added sugar, and has determined that this information supports this daily value for added sugars. The DGAC also recommended that Americans limit their added sugars intake to less than 10 percent of total calories; this and other recommendations from the DGAC, which is an independent advisory committee, will be considered in the development of the final 2015 Dietary Guidelines.

The FDA’s initial proposal to include the amount of added sugars on the Nutrition Facts label is now further supported by newly reviewed studies suggesting healthy dietary patterns, including lower amounts of sugar-sweetened foods and beverages, are strongly associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease. When sugars are added to foods and beverages to sweeten them, they add calories without providing additional nutrients.

“The FDA has a responsibility to give consumers the information they need to make informed dietary decisions for themselves and their families,” said Susan Mayne, Ph.D., director of the FDA’s Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition. “For the past decade, consumers have been advised to reduce their intake of added sugars, and the proposed percent daily value for added sugars on the Nutrition Facts label is intended to help consumers follow that advice.”

The current label requires the percent daily value be listed for total fat, saturated fat, cholesterol, sodium, total carbohydrate, dietary fiber, calcium and iron.

The FDA is also proposing to change the current footnote on the Nutrition Facts label to help consumers understand the percent daily value concept. The proposed statement on the label would be shorter than the current footnote to allow for more space on the label, stating:

*The percent daily value (%DV) tells you how much a nutrient in a serving of food contributes to a daily diet. 2,000 calories a day is used for general nutrition advice.

The FDA is seeking public comment on the proposal for 75 days. The agency continues to review comments received on the 2014 proposed rule and is reopening the comment period on its March 2014 proposal for 60 days to invite public comment on two consumer studies related to label formats. The agency will consider comments on the original and this supplemental proposed rule before issuing a final rule. The proposed rule on serving size requirements, also issued in March 2014, is not affected by the supplemental proposed rule on the Nutrition Facts label released today.

In addition, the FDA is also releasing results of its consumer studies on the declaration of added sugars and the footnote and on the label format. As part of the March 3, 2014 proposed rule, FDA proposed updating the format of the Nutrition Facts panel and continues to consider the comments received on this proposal as it develops the final rule. Based on comments received to the proposed rule and the consumer studies’ results, the FDA does not intend to pursue the alternative graphic format for the Nutrition Facts label at this time.

FSA Board agrees restrictions on raw milk should remain

cow2

The FSA Board met to discuss the findings of the comprehensive review of the regulations that control the sale of unpasteurised, or raw, drinking milk.

The review concluded that:

  • the risk associated with raw drinking milk consumption, except for vulnerable groups, is acceptable when appropriate hygiene controls are applied
  • the current restriction on sales of raw milk should remain in place as there is uncertainty that consumer protection can be maintained if the market for raw milk is expanded
  • risk communication could be improved, particularly for vulnerable groups, and changes to the labelling requirements are proposed to reflect this

The Board accepted the conclusions of the review.  However, they noted concerns that consumers should be more aware of the risks and asked that the FSA be clear in its advice not to drink raw milk.

The Board noted reports of non-compliance in the industry and agreed that supporting improvements in compliance should be a focus for FSA action.

In a development to the FSA’s approach to the control of ‘risky’ foods, the Board agreed that we will now identify triggers relating to outbreaks, detection of pathogens in raw drinking milk samples, and changes in the retail market for raw drinking milk that would require a further discussion of risks and controls. This will be facilitated by regular reporting of compliance in this sector to the Board.

The FSA reviewed the current controls to make sure they are clear, consistent and control the public health risks associated with raw milk. The review covered England, Wales, and Northern Ireland. Sale of raw drinking milk is banned in Scotland.

The consultation considered a number of options. These ranged from removing restrictions on sales through to introducing a requirement for all milk to be pasteurised prior to sale.

(Source: FSA Website)

Food recalls in EU – Week 27-28/2015

Tofu

This week on the EU RASFF (Rapid Alert System for Food and Feed) we can find the following notifications:

1. Alerts followed by a recall from consumers:

– Allergens: undeclared gluten and egg in cream of potato & spinach soup from Germany, following a consumer complaint. Notified from United Kingdom, distributed also to Ireland and Italy;

– Allergens: traces of almond in hot paprika and chili powder from China, following company’s own check. Notified by Greece, distributed also to Albania, Cyprus and Germany;

– Allergens: undeclared sulphite (17.0 mg/kg – ppm) in sweets from Belgium, following company’s own check. Notified by Belgium, distributed also to France;

– Allergens: undeclared gluten, soya, nuts and lactose (ingredients list in Danish, Finnish and Swedish is missing on the label) in icecream from Germany, following company’s own check. Notified by Denmark;

– Foreign bodies: plastic fragments in tofu basilico from Germany, following company’s own check. Notified by United Kingdom, distributed also to Austria, Belgium, France, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Spain, Sweden and Switzerland;

– Foreign bodies: rat droppings in breakfast cereals from the United Kingdom, following a consumer complaint. Notified by Denmark, distributed also to Norway;

– FCM (Food Contact Materials): migration of primary aromatic amines (7.48; 0.005; 0.009 mg/kg – ppm) from plastic kitchenware from China, following an official control on the market. Notified by Poland, distributed also to Slovakia;

– FCM (Food Contact Materials): migration of aluminium (32.8; 14.7 mg/l) from ceramic balls from China, following an official control on the market. Notified by France, distributed also to Belgium;

– Mycotoxins: patulin (147 µg/kg – ppb) in apple juice from Belgium, following company’s own check. Notified by Belgium, distributed also to France.

2. Information for attention/for follow up followed by a recall from consumers:

– Foreign bodies: rodent (mouse tail) in chocolate and hazelnut muesli from Belgium, following a consumer complaint. Notified by Greece, distributed also to Denmark;

– Non pathogenic micro-organisms: hazelnut kernels from Sweden infested with mouldsfollowing a consumer complaint. Notified by Denmark, distributed also to Iceland;

– Non pathogenic micro organisms: chilled diced or shredded chicken and pork products from Poland infested with yeastsfollowing a company’s own check. Notified by Denmark, distributed also to Greenland, Germany and Faeroe Islands;

– Pesticides residues: chlorpyrifos (2.3 mg/kg – ppm) in celery from Laos, following an official control on the market. Notified by Denmark;

– Residues of veterinary medicinal products: sulfonamide (865 µg/kg – ppb) unauthorised in honey from Germany, following an official control on the market. Notified by Germany, distributed also to Austria, Cyprus, France, Greece, Malta, Spain, Sweden and United Kingdom;

3. Alerts followed by a withdrawal from the market:

– Allergens: traces of almond in sauces from the Netherlands, following a company’s own check. Notified by Netherlands, distributed also to Austria, Belgium, Curacao, France, Germany, Greece, Luxembourg, Spain, Sweden and United Kingdom;

– Allergens: traces of milk (20 mg/kg – ppm) in marzipan with honey and chocolate from Germany, via Austria, following an official control on the market. Notified by Slovenia, distributed also to Croatia, Estonia, France, Poland and Slovakia;

– Composition: high content of aluminium (253 mg/kg – ppm) in glass noodles from Vietnam, following an official control on the market. Notified by Germany, distributed also to France;

– Heavy metals: cadmium (0.362 mg/kg – ppm) and mercury (4.45 mg/kg – ppm) in frozen swordfish from Spain, following an official control on the market. Notified by France, distributed also to Germany and Ireland;

– Industrial contaminants: sum of dioxins and dioxin-like polychlorobifenyls (22 pg WHO TEQ/g) in eggs from the Netherlands, following company’s own check. Notified by Netherlands, distributed also to Belgium;

– Pesticide residues: chlorpyrifos (0.09 mg/kg – ppm) in frozen broccoli from Poland, following an official control on the market. Notified by Estonia.

4. Seizures:

In Italy we had seizures of stainless steel knives from China for migration of chromium (18.3 mg/l) and of manganese (1.1 mg/l), of complete feed for aquaculture for presence of ruminant DNA and of chilled swordfish loins (Xiphias gladius) from Spain for presence of mercury (1.9 mg/kg – ppm)following official controls on the market.

We had also a seizure

5. Border rejections:

  • absence of health certificate(s) for egusi melon seeds from Nigeria and for emu oil capsules and liquid emu oil from the United States, via Canada
  • absence of Common Entry Document (CED) for dried beans from Nigeria
  • aflatoxins (B1 = 103; Tot. = 119 / B1 = 21.4; Tot. = 25.9 µg/kg – ppb) in pistachios in shell and in pistachio kernels (Tot. = 26.9 µg/kg – ppb) from Iran
  • aflatoxins (B1 = 14.6; Tot. = 15.4 µg/kg – ppb) in peanuts in shell, in unshelled peanuts (B1 = 5.4; Tot. = 17.9 µg/kg – ppb), in groundnuts kernels (B1 = 12.2; Tot. = 24 µg/kg – ppb) and in groundnuts (Tot. = 95 µg/kg – ppb) from China
  • aflatoxins (B1 = 162.6; Tot. = 242.9 µg/kg – ppb) in peanut chips from Nigeria
  • aflatoxins (B1 = 18.85; Tot. = 11.84 µg/kg – ppb) in groundnuts from Brazil
  • aflatoxins (B1 = 27.1 µg/kg – ppb) in roasted pistachios from Turkey
  • aflatoxins (B1 = 30; Tot. = 33 µg/kg – ppb) in nutmeg from Indonesia
  • aflatoxins (B1 = 28; Tot. = 31 µg/kg – ppb) in shelled pistachios, in pistachios in shell (B1 = 82.8; Tot. = 89 µg/kg – ppb) and in shelled almonds (B1 = 15 µg/kg – ppb) from the United States
  • aflatoxins (B1 = 89.4; Tot. = 93.9 µg/kg – ppb) and ochratoxin A (45 µg/kg – ppb) in and absence of labelling on mixed spices from Kuwait
  • attempt to illegally import dried beans from Nigeria
  • chlorpyrifos (0.12 mg/kg – ppm), cyhalothrin (0.37 mg/kg – ppm) and unauthorised substance dichlorvos (0.32 mg/kg – ppm) in dried beans from Nigeria
  • endosulfan (0.14 mg/kg – ppm) and buprofezin (0.60 mg/kg – ppm) in green tea from South Korea
  • FCM: migration of cadmium (0.453 mg/dm²) from ceramic spoons from China
  • FCM: migration of nickel (672 mg/kg – ppm) from wine stopper from China, via Hong Kong
  • high counts of coliforms (160000 CFU/g) and of Enterobacteriaceae (170000 CFU/g) in peanut kernels from Turkey
  • fenitrothion (0.05 mg/kg – ppm) in olives in brine from Egypt
  • mercury (1.893 mg/kg – ppm) in chilled tuna from Ecuador
  • peanuts in shell from China infested with moulds and with mites
  • poor temperature control (-4.9; -6.7; -5.5 °C) of frozen whole chicken from Ukraine, (+6 <–> 11 °C) of chilled fish from Pakistan, (+8.8; 6.8; 7.4; 6.6; 7.0 °C) of chilled swordfish (Xiphias gladius) and (> -12 °C) of frozen boneless beef meat (Bos taurus) from Chile, of chilled fish from India, (-3.5<–> -10.4 °C) of frozen shimps (Penaeus vannamei) from Malaysia and (-7.6, – 8.2, – 7.8, – 8.5, -10.8, -7.1 °C) of chilled tuna (Thunnus albacares) from Sri Lanka
  • Salmonella spp. (in 1 out of 5 samples /25g) in paan/betel leaves from India
  • Salmonella spp. (presence /25g) in hulled sesame seeds from India
  • Salmonella (present /25g) in frozen salted chicken, in frozen salted chicken preparation and in frozen salted boneless skinless chicken breasts from Thailand
  • too high content of colour E 102 – tartrazine (0.08 %) and unauthorised use of colour E 110 – Sunset Yellow FCF (0.005 %) and of colour E 129 – Allura Red AC (0.08 %) in canned preserved vegetables from Mexico
  • unauthorised colour Sudan 4 (0.8 mg/kg – ppm) in palm oil from Ghana

Milan 27.10.15 – Practical course on official controls and food frauds prevention strategies

milano piazza del duomo

On 27th October 2015 I will be in Milan for a full day practical seminar on how to defend your business from official controls, non compliance events and food frauds. The course is organized and hosted in a wonderful location near the beautiful “Duomo” by Certiquality, certification body, accredited to provide enterprises with certification services covering Quality, Environmental and Safety Management Systems, as well as Product Certification. Certiquality also operates on Food Safety, on auditing Data Security in the EDP systems, and on Professional Training.

Aim of the course is to offer to the food business operators the instruments to comprehend which are their rights and their obligations during the official controls and the administrative and/or criminal proceedings which follow the non-compliance.

We will analyze the main issues linked to the sampling and testing phase and how to manage an inspection from the competent authority, which kind of measures the competent authorities can apply (i.e. seizures), how to handle a food recall and how to prevent unintentional frauds (i.e. Horsemeat scandal), with practical examples.

The EU Commission is working on a revision of the Reg. (EC) n. 882/2004 on official controls on foodstuffs, and within this context is also evaluating if establishing a common definition of “food frauds” and how to build a credible enforcement system to prevent such incidents.

It is of pivotal importance to be updated on those aspects, since the publication of the new Regulation (in origin fixed for the end of 2015) probably will be in the first half of 2016.

Write me at foodlawlatest@gmail.com to have the full program and book your place.

Language of the course: Italian. For readers from foreign countries I remember that I can organize also sessions via webinar/distance learning.

FDA delays compliance date for menu calories labelling

menucalories

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is extending the compliance date for the final rule requiring disclosure of certain nutrition information for standard menu items in certain restaurants and retail food establishments. The final rule appeared in the Federal Register of December 1, 2014 and it was supposed to enter in application on December 1, 2015: the date is delayed by one year, to December 1, 2016.

FDA is taking this action in response to requests for an extension and for further clarification of the rule’s requirements. One of the major problem stressed by the food business operators was the complexity of the software needed to grant this kind of information.

The FDA will publish further clarification, probably with the Q&A format.

It has to be noticed that in New York a similar rule is effective from 2008, and some major companies like Starbucks and McDonalds has yet implemented the calories indication on menus/boards.

UK – Palm Oil recalled because it contains the illegal dye Sudan

Sudan Colours

This recall, issued by the FSA (Food Standard Agency – UK) is not the first registered this year and it seems that after the Sudan dyes scandal in 2003, the problem is (re)emerging.

Fovitor International Ltd is recalling its Dzomi Palm Oil (1 litre bottle) with a ‘best before’ end date of 31 October 2016 because it contains the illegal dye known as Sudan IV, which is potentially genotoxic and possibly carcinogenic. Sudan dyes are red dyes that are used for colouring solvents, oils, waxes, petrol, and shoe and floor polishes.

Product: Dzomi Palm Oil (1 litre bottles)
‘Best before’ end: 31 October 2016

Picture of the product can be found via the following link.

No other Fovitor International Ltd or Dzomi products are known to be affected.

If you have bought the above product, do not consume it. Instead, return it to the store from where it was bought for a full refund.

Fovitor International Ltd is recalling the above product. The company has notified all of its customers that were distributed this product, via a point-of-sale notice. The notice, which can be found via the following link, alerts consumers to the recall and advises them what to do if they have bought the product.

(Source: FSA website)

FVO audit – Post slaughter traceability issues in Luxembourg

Carni

An audit to Luxembourg was carried out from 25 November to 4 December 2014. The main objective of the audit was to evaluate the operation of official controls over the traceability of meat (meat of domestic ungulates, poultry, lagomorphs and game meat), minced meat, mechanically separated meat (MSM), meat preparations, meat products (hereafter referred to as meat and products thereof), and composite products containing meat and products thereof and other ingredients.

Particular attention was paid to the traceability, labelling and identification systems of meat and products thereof, and to composite products containing meat and products thereof and traceability of quantities of each ingredient used.

The Competent Authority (CA) responsible for official controls in the scope of the audit has been designated in compliance with Article 4 (1) of Chapter II of Regulation (EC) No 882/2004. The CA is still in the process of amending the National Food Law of 1953 in order to ensure that appropriate action is taken and applicable sanctions are imposed and enforced when non-compliances are identified, as required by Articles 54 and 55 of Regulation (EC) No 882/2004. Within the scope of the audit, the official control plans are implemented as foreseen and are carried out in accordance with documented procedures. Official controls cover identification, labelling and traceability.

However the limited controls on additives, labelling and composition, the lack of systematic control of quantitative traceability or procedures for an in depth verification of food business operators’ (FBOs) traceability procedures and the lack of the possibility to impose administrative sanctions are undermining the effectiveness of official controls.

The CA’s control results for the selected samples indicated non-compliances, but some significant non-compliances related to traceability, labelling and/or the use of additives were not detected. While the system of official controls includes verification of FBOs’ compliance with traceability, application of identification marks and labelling, it is not sufficiently developed. Several deficiencies had not been identified during official controls, in particular, verification of the correctness of the information and content on the label, links between different traceability documents and comprehensive control on the use of ingredients additives and/or spices.

Here you can check the competent Authority answers to the Food Veterinary Office recommendations.

 

UK – FSA recall notice: Clostridium Botulinum in smoked fish products vacuum packed

Clostridium_difficile

The Food Standard Agency (FSA) issued the following product recall information notice.

J & K Smokery Ltd has recalled all packs of its vacuum packed smoked fish because of concerns about procedures to control Clostridium botulinum.

The effectiveness of process controls that could potentially affect the safety of vacuum packed smoked fish produced by J & K Smokery Ltd, cannot be demonstrated satisfactorily.

The products being recalled are:

Product: J & K Smokery all vacuum packed smoked fish products
Pack size: all
Batch code: all
Date codes: all
Approval number: UK LO 068 EC

The company supplies stores and mobile fish suppliers and has told all of these retail customers. A point-of-sale notice will be displayed by businesses selling the recalled products, explaining to consumers why the products have been recalled.

If you have bought any of the above products, do not consume them. Instead, return them to the store or mobile fish supplier from where they were bought for a full refund.

(Source: FSA website)

Food recalls in EU – Week 26

yohimbine-bark-extract-41-powder

This week on the EU RASFF (Rapid Alert System for Food and Feed) we can find the following notifications:

1. Alerts followed by a recall from consumers:

– Allergens: undeclared gluten in crispy fried onions from the Netherlands, following company’s own check. Notified by United Kingdom, distributed also to Ireland;

– Composition: unauthorised substance yohimbine (0.5 mg/item) in food supplement from the United States, via Hungary, following an official control on the market. Notified by Cyprus;

– FCM (Food Contact Materials). Migration: high content of DEHP – di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (93000; 120000 mg/kg – ppm) in placemat from Denmark, following an official control on the market. Notified by Denmark, distributed also to Faeroe Islands, Germany, Norway, Poland and Sweden;

– Pathogenic micro-organisms: Salmonella spp. (presence/25g) in seasoning with vegetables from Croatia, following an official control on the market. Notified by Austria, distributed also to Germany and Slovakia;

– Residues of veterinary medicinal products: prohibited substance nitrofuran (metabolite) furaltadone (AMOZ) (0.89; 2.0; 1.47 µg/kg – ppb) in chilled rainbow trout from Greece, following an official control on the market. Notified by Greece, distributed also to Romania.

2. Information for attention/for follow up followed by a recall from consumers:

– Pathogenic micro-organisms: Salmonella Newport (presence/25g) in turkey breast from Germany, following an official control in a non member country. Notified by Denmark.

3. Alerts followed by a withdrawal from the market/from recipients:

– Composition: high content of morphine (59.13 mg/kg – ppm) in ground poppy seeds packaged in Slovakia, following company’s own check. Notified by Czech Republic;

– Heavy metals: mercury (1.4 mg/kg – ppm) in frozen swordfish from Portugal, following an official control on the market. Notified by Italy;

– Industrial contaminants: dioxins (76.94 pg WHO TEQ/g) in cod liver from Latvia, following an official control on the market. Notified by Germany, distributed also to Italy, Ireland and United Kingdom;

– Pathogenic micro-organisms: Bacillus cereus (>120 000 CFU/g) and Bacillus cereus enterotoxin (2.65 µg/kg – ppb) in preserved red bean curd from China, following am official control on the market. Notified by Netherlands, distributed also to Austria, Denmark, Germany, Netherlands, Poland and Spain;

– Pesticide residues: ethephon (4.6 mg/kg – ppm) in pineapples from Benin, via France, following an official control on the market. Notified by Belgium.

4. Seizures:

None

5. Border rejections:

  • absence of expiry date on frozen squid (Loligo chinensis) from China
  • absence of health certificate(s) for groundnuts from India
  • aflatoxins (B1 = 32; Tot. = 36 µg/kg – ppb) in pistachios from Iran
  • aflatoxins (B1 = 41; Tot. = 52 / B1 = 12; Tot. = 14 µg/kg – ppb) in groundnuts from Argentina
  • aflatoxins (B1 = 9.9 µg/kg – ppb) in salted roasted pistachios from Turkey
  • attempt to illegally import (hidden under carab beans.) dried fish and shrimps from Ghana
  • poor temperature control – rupture of the cold chain – (totally defrosted) of frozen squid (Loligo spp.) from India, and from India via Vietnam
  • poor temperature control (+ 7.2; 5.2; 12.8; 10.2; 12.2; 13.2 °C) of chilled tuna (Thunnus albacares) from the Philippines
  • Salmonella spp. (presence /25g) in betel leaves from India
  • shigatoxin-producing Escherichia coli (presence /25g) in frozen boneless beef from Brazil
  • spoilage (decomposition) of chilled grouper (Epinephelus guaza) from Egypt and of frozen salted chicken from Thailand
  • too high content of E 211 – sodium benzoate (1000 mg/kg – ppm), E 202 – potassium sorbate (1000; 2000; 800 mg/kg – ppm), E 385 – calcium disodium ethylene diamine tetra acetate (CDEDTA), E 321 – butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) (presence) and E 223 – Sodium metabisulphite (presence) unauthorised in preserved vegetables from Mexico
  • traces of egg (0.063 mg/kg – ppm) in frozen threadfin bream (Nemipterus spp) from Thailand
  • unauthorised substance carbendazim (0.4 mg/kg – ppm) in sweet peppers from Turkey
  • unauthorised substance profenofos (0.07 mg/item) in peppers in brine from India

Conference – Expo Milan – Food and Agricultural Markets Instability: Policies and Regulation Perspectives

Chiostro_UC

I am pleased to signal you to the upcoming conference titled “Food and Agricultural Markets Instability: Policies and Regulation Perspectives” during Expo Milan 2015.

The conference is jointly organised by the European Commission’s Joint Research Centre,  Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore and the 7th Framework Programme Project ULYSSES (Understanding and coping with food markets volatility towards more stable World and EU food systems).

The conference is part of the activities promoted by the Scientific Committee for Expo 2015 and the European Union, in which all the Milan Universities are actively involved. During the conference, international experts will discuss how food and agricultural markets can become more stable, and what policies and regulatory frameworks should be implemented to make world food systems more efficient, sustainable and predictable.
The conference will take place at Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore (Room Pio XI, Largo Gemelli 1, Milan) on July 9, and at the EU Pavilion at Expo – Room Europa on  July 10.

The final confirmation of participation for those who request an invitation for July 10, guarantees a Free Expo Entry ticket for the work session that will be held at the EU Pavilion in Expo.

The program can be downloaded here.

For more details and to register, please visit this website or go to the registration page.

Follow-up to the fraud of crushed almond shells in cumin: “Bart Ground Cumin” recall rescinded

659_26

On April 28, we reported the news of the detection of crushed almond shells in spices, especially cumin, paprika and various mix, at a level not yet identified of the supply chain, with the clear aim of financial gain. On this occasion, the results of the analysis were considered unreliable by Bart Ingredients, a British food company, which has highlighted the possibility of “false-positives” attributed to another ingredient, the “mahaleb”, extracted from a variety of cherry tree.

The 29th June, the Food Standards Agency has rescinded a recall of a batch of ground cumin sold by the Bart Ingredients Company. The affected product had tested positive for the presence of almond protein which is not declared on the label. This follow the same decision by CFIA (Canadian Food Inspection Agency) on other cases: few weeks ago, indeed, the Canadian authority detected the same issue.

Additional testing by the Laboratory of the Government Chemist (LGC) has shown a spice called mahaleb was present and not almond protein. Mahaleb and almond are from the same ‘Prunus’ family of trees and shrubs. However, mahaleb is not one of the 14 allergens identified in food allergen legislation. There is no evidence that the contamination was a result of fraudulent activity.

The level of almond protein detected was considered to be a risk to people with an allergy to almond. The company subsequently produced test results from samples of the same material that contradicted the positive result. 

Will Creswell, Head of Consumer Protection at the FSA, said: ‘Throughout this incident we have carried out protein and DNA testing, using accredited laboratories and validated methods, and both indicated the presence of almond protein in this product. Consumer safety is the FSA’s highest priority and our risk assessment at the time was that this product could potentially harm people with an allergy to almond. We were correct to ask Bart Ingredients to take precautionary action. Now that new evidence has come to light we are able to rescind this particular recall.

‘The FSA will now work with public analysts, analytical scientists, the industry and local authorities to review these testing methodologies. As with all significant incidents, we will also work together to review our actions and identify what lessons can be learned.’

LGC used a type of analysis called ‘liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry’ which, in combination with DNA testing, found that mahaleb could produce a false positive result for almond protein in cumin. This is the first time researchers have identified this type of reaction.

Michael Walker, Consultant Referee Analyst in the Laboratory of the Government Chemist, said: ‘This has been a pioneering and resource intensive scientific investigation involving a large multidisciplinary team of scientists. Almond and other Prunus species in spices had received little attention. We now know that ELISA detection is useful but only as a screening test. There are unusually high similarities in the DNA and protein of these related species that make it very difficult to tell them apart in spices. But thanks to the expertise of the molecular biologists and protein chemists in LGC we have developed what is, to the best of our knowledge, the world’s first DNA test for mahaleb and discovered subtle mass spectrometry differences to distinguish almond and mahaleb proteins.’

There have been several other recalls in the UK during this incident, the majority of which have been for undeclared almond in paprika products.  There is currently no evidence of cross-reactivity due to mahaleb in paprika. However, the FSA is doing further research to clarify this.

All other recalls in the UK associated with almond contamination of paprika still stand as the evidence presently available to the FSA suggests the affected products remain a potential health risk to people with an allergy to almond.

Hinoman reveals the smallest veggie protein to launch at IFT

Hinoman reveals the smallest veggie protein

June 29, Tel Aviv—Hinoman, Ltd., announces the official launch of Mankai, a vegetable whole-protein ingredient with high nutritional value, at IFT, Chicago, July 11-14.

Mankai is an aquacultured source of vegetable protein with exceptional nutritional value. The vitamin and mineral-rich Mankai plant is a native of Southeast Asia, and has been enjoyed in Thailand, Laos and Vietnam for generations. Hinoman’s hydroponic technology enables it to grow the product faster, and in large quantities, without pesticides, while guaranteeing a high protein content of at least 45% by dry weight.

Mankai is the world’s smallest vegetable—0.5 mm (less than 1/5 inch). Due to its small particle size, it can be easily incorporated in its natural form into food or beverage applications. “The Mankai plant boasts the closest protein profile to animal protein,” explains Udi Alroy, VP of Marketing and Business Development for Hinoman. “The paradox is that this tiny, single-strain microgreen delivers huge health benefits to a wide range of market targets and addresses not only the race for new protein sources but also offers perfect solutions to trendy diets, such as Paleo  and vegan.”

Protein quality depends on digestibility, amino acid profile and content. A high-quality protein contains all the essential amino acids (those the body must source externally), with a high proportion of the branched chain amino acids (BCAA). Mankai is rich in vitamins A and E, the B vitamins, plus minerals and fatty acids. Mankai’s precision cultivation method produces reliable and consistent nutrient levels, answering all “free-from” requirements and enabling a clean label.

“All the protein parameters are high in Mankai,” says Ron Salpeter, CEO for Hinoman. “With its high PDCAAS rate of digestibility—0.89—it is more potent than super vegetables, such as spinach, spirulina and kale. Mankai has a light vegetal flavor, superior to algae-derived ingredients in the market.”

Albenga 2.7.15 – Official controls and food fraud course at the Savona Chamber of Commerce

20110228182023

On 2nd July 2015 I will be in Albenga for a full day practical seminar on how to defend your business from official controls, non compliance events and food frauds.

The course is hosted and organized by Certiquality, certification body, accredited to provide enterprises with certification services covering Quality, Environmental and Safety Management Systems, as well as Product Certification, hosted by the local Chamber of Commerce Analytical Lab and supported by Confindustria and our Ministry of Agriculture ICQRF (Institute for food frauds and quality schemes infringements repression).

Aim of the course is to offer to the food business operators the instruments to comprehend which are their rights and their obligations during the official controls and the administrative and/or criminal proceedings which follow the non-compliance.

We will analyze the main issues linked to the sampling and testing phase and how to manage an inspection from the competent authority, which kind of measures the competent authorities can apply (i.e. seizures), how to handle a food recall and how to prevent unintentional frauds (i.e. Horsemeat scandal), with practical examples.

The EU Commission is working on a revision of the Reg. (CE) n. 882/2004 on official controls on foodstuffs, and within this context is also evaluating if establishing a common definition of “food frauds” and how to build a credible enforcement system to prevent such incidents.

It is of pivotal importance to be updated on those aspects, since the publication of the new Regulation (in origin fixed for the end of 2015) probably will be in the first half of 2016.

You can see the full program here and register at the following page.

Language of the course: Italian. For readers from foreign countries I remember that I can organize also sessions via webinar/distance learning.

Extensive case of mislabeling: Investigation alleges Whole Foods Overcharges

whole-foods-1024x768

New York City’s Department of Consumer Affairs (DCA) said Wednesday 24 June that an ongoing investigation on Whole Foods Market stores has found systemic overcharging of its customers for pre-packaged food.

The investigation by the DCA tested 80 different types of pre-packaged food from the city’s Whole Foods locations (eight were open at the time of the investigation; a ninth has since opened). The inspection found all categories included products with incorrect weights, which led to overcharges that ranged from 80 cents for a package of pecan panko to $14.84 for coconut shrimp. The overcharges were especially prevalent in packages that had been labelled with exactly the same weight when it would be practically impossible for all of the packages to weigh the same amount. The investigation also examined vegetable platters, nuts, chicken tenders and berries.

The DCA added, in addition, that 89 percent of the tested packages were not in line with the federal standards for the maximum amount “that an individual package can deviate from the actual weight”.

Whole Foods said in a statement: “We disagree with the DCA’s overreaching allegations and we are vigorously defending ourselves. We cooperated fully with the DCA from the beginning until we disagreed with their grossly excessive monetary demands. Despite our requests to the DCA, they have not provided evidence to back up their demands nor have they requested any additional information from us, but instead have taken this to the media to coerce us.”

Both Whole Foods and DCA declined to discuss specific numbers, citing the fact that the investigation is ongoing.

Food recalls in EU – Week 25/2015

pouring milk in a glass isolated

This week on the EU RASFF (Rapid Alert System for Food and Feed) we can find the following notifications:

1. Alerts followed by a recall from consumers:

Allergens: undeclared soya and celery  in canned vegetable ravioli in tomato & herb sauce from Belgium, following an official control on the market. Notified by United Kingdom;

– FCM (Food Contact Materials). Heavy metals: migration of cadmium (mean value 0.63 mg/item) and of lead (mean value: 5.6 mg/item) from tumblers from China, following an official control on the market. Notified by Poland, distributed also to Estonia, Russia and Ukraine;

– Pathogenic micro-organisms: Salmonella spp. (presence/25g) in sausages from Spain, following company’s own check. Notified by France.

2. Information for attention/for follow up followed by a recall from consumers:

– Food additives and flavourings: unauthorised use of colour E 127 – erythrosine (56 mg/kg – ppm) in cupcakes from South Africa, following an official control on the market. Notified by Belgium, distributed also to France, Luxembourg and Netherlands;

– Non pathogenic micro-organisms: cranberry juice from Denmark infested with moulds, following a consumer complaint. Notified by Denmark, distributed also to Germany, Iceland, Norway and Sweden.

3. Alerts followed by a withdrawal from the market/from recipients:

– Allergens: undeclared milk ingredient, soya and lactose in acai ice covered with chocolate from Slovakia, following company’s own check. Notified by Netherlands, distributed also to Belgium;

– Allergens: undeclared milk ingredient (protein: 7.2; 13.5 mg/kg – ppm) in biscuits with orange jelly from Poland, following an official control on the market. Notified by Spain;

– Foreign bodies: glass fragments in chilled raw pork meat from Spain, following company’s own check. Notified by France

– Mycotoxins: fumonisins (B1: 2319.84; sum of FB1, FB2: 2642.47 µg/kg – ppb) in popcorn from Hungary, following an official control on the market. Notified by Slovakia;

– Pathogenic micro-organisms: Listeria monocytogenes (140/g) in cheese with bacon from Spain, following an official control on the market. Notified by Netherlands, distributed also to Belgium;

– Pathogenic micro-organisms: Listeria monocytogenes ( in raw milk cheese from France, following company’s own check. Notified by France, distributed also to Belgium and United Kingdom;

– Pathogenic micro-organisms: Salmonella spp. (presence/25g) in chilled ham from France, following company’s own check. Notified by France, distributed also to Switzerland and United Kingdom.

4. Seizures:

– In Norway we had a seizure for unauthorised placing on the market of cod liver oil, following an official control on the market. Notified by Norway, distributed also to Denmark and Finland;

– In United Kingdom, we had a seizure for illegal import of mint from Vietnam, following a border control. Notified by United Kingdom.

5. Border rejections:

  • acetamiprid (0.092 mg/kg – ppm) and dimethoate (0.34 mg/kg – ppm) in tea from China
  • aflatoxins (B1 = 21.50; Tot. = 23.58 µg/kg – ppb) in pistachios from Turkey and from Iran, via Turkey (Tot. = 47.5 µg/kg – ppb)
  • aflatoxins (B1 = 251; Tot. = 284 µg/kg – ppb) in rice from Thailand
  • aflatoxins (B1 = 4.5 µg/kg – ppb) in groundnuts from China
  • clothianidin (0.22 mg/kg – ppm) in chili peppers from the Dominican Republic
  • dried apricots from Turkey infested with moulds
  • fenamiphos (0.167 mg/kg – ppm) in sweet peppers from Turkey
  • live insects in basmati rice from India
  • mandipropamid (0.052 mg/kg – ppm) in fresh pea pods from Kenya
  • FCM (Food Contact Materials): migration of chromium (6.2 mg/kg – ppm) and of manganese (2.2 mg/kg – ppm) from steel tools for barbecue from China
  • FCM (Food Contact Materials) too high content of chromium (0.4 mg/kg – ppm) in tongs for spaghetti from China
  • omethoate (0.03 mg/kg – ppm) in mangos from Brazil
  • poor temperature control (>-12 °C) of frozen chicken from Ukraine
  • Salmonella spp. (presence /25g) in betel/paan leaves, sesame seeds and hulled sesame seeds from India
  • shigatoxin-producing Escherichia coli (stx+ and eae+) in chilled boneless beef from Brazil
  • unauthorised irradiation (thermoluminescence) of red rice extract from China
  • unauthorised substance anthraquinone (0.047 mg/kg – ppm) in black tea from China
  • unauthorised substance carbendazim (1.3 mg/kg – ppm) in dragon fruits
  • unauthorised substance chlorfenapyr (0.017 mg/kg – ppm) in papayas from Brazil
  • unauthorised substance dichlorvos (0.18 mg/kg – ppm) in dried beans from Nigeria

Written QeA to EU Commission – Performance-Enhancing Substances in Foods for Sportspeople

Urban sports - fitness in the city

Question for written answer to the Commission

Alain Cadec (PPE) – 15 April 2015

Subject: Foods for sportspeople

All the EU Member States have agreed to take the steps required to enforce the international agreements concluded in cooperation with the World Anti-Doping Agency, the aim of which is to ensure that foodstuffs and supplements intended for sportspeople are completely free from performance-enhancing substances.

The lack of harmonisation at EU level in this area has meant that Member States have taken a range of approaches when establishing quality assurance systems designed to ensure that foods intended for sportspeople do not contain performance-enhancing substances. This is particularly true when it comes to labelling. The result has been a proliferation of standards and logos, and confusion for consumers.

Article 13 of Regulation (EU) No 609/2013 requires the Commission to submit a report to Parliament and the Council by 20 July 2015 on the advisability of introducing specific provisions relating to food intended for sportspeople.

Will this report cover the issue of ensuring that foods intended for sportspeople are free from performance-enhancing substances? Does the Commission intend to stress the need for the provisions concerning dietary requirements and those relating to performance-enhancing drugs to be consistent?

Given the current confusion, action should be taken to ensure that foods intended for sports people do not contain any performance-enhancing substances.

Answer given by Mr Andriukaitis on behalf of the Commission – 15 June 2015

Article 13 of Regulation (EU) No 609/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council on food intended for infants and young children, food for special medical purposes and total diet replacement for weight control(1) requires the Commission, after consulting the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA), to present to the European Parliament and to the Council a report on the necessity, if any, of provisions for food intended for sportspeople. Such a report may, if necessary, be accompanied by an appropriate legislative proposal. As specified in Recital 33 of that regulation, the main focus of the report should be whether provisions are necessary to ensure the protection of consumers.

In preparation of the report, the Commission has requested an external contractor to carry out a study for gathering relevant information, among others, about the current market of food intended for sportspeople. This exercise includes extensive consultation of relevant stakeholders and competent authorities of the Member States. On the basis of the study and after having consulted EFSA, the Commission will present its report as requested by Regulation (EU) No 609/2013. The outcome of the report cannot at the moment be anticipated.

(1) OJ L 181, 29.6.2013, p. 35.

(Source: EU Parliament)

FDA ruling on Trans-Fats

trans_fats_

FDA released its’ final determination that Partially Hydrogenated Oils (PHOs) are not Generally Recognized as Safe (GRAS). The determination is based on extensive research into the effects of PHOs, as well as input from stakeholders during the public comment period.

PHOs are the primary dietary source of artificial trans fat in processed foods. In FDA view, removing PHOs from processed foods could prevent thousands of heart attacks and deaths each year.

Implementation

FDA has set a compliance period of three years. This will allow food companies to either reformulate products without PHOs and/or petition the FDA to permit specific uses of PHOs. Many companies have already been working to remove PHOs from processed foods and the FDA anticipates that many may eliminate them ahead of the three-year compliance date.

It’s important to note that trans fat will not be completely gone from foods because it occurs naturally in small amounts in meat and dairy products, and is present at very low levels in other edible oils.

The FDA encourages consumers seeking to reduce trans fat intake to check a food’s ingredient list to determine whether or not it contains partially hydrogenated oil.

Background

In January 2006, FDA required the food industry to declare the amount of trans fat in food on the Nutrition Facts label. FDA data indicate that many processed foods have been reformulated to reduce the amount of trans fat since the requirement was instituted, but a substantial number of products still contain PHOs.

One of FDA’s core regulatory functions is ensuring that food, including all substances added to food, is safe. In November 2013, FDA made a preliminary determination that PHOs are not “generally recognized as safe” (GRAS) for use in food. FDA opened a 60-day public comment period on this measure to solicit data and information on a number of issues, including:

1. Whether FDA should finalize its tentative determination that PHOs are no longer GRAS;
2. How long it would take producers to reformulate food products to eliminate PHOs.

The comment period was then extended an additional 60 days and closed March 8, 2014.

The final determination was released June 16, 2015. This determination is based on extensive research into the effects of PHOs, as well as input from all stakeholders received during the public comment period (see Final Determination Regarding Partially Hydrogenated Oils, June 2015).

To learn more about trans fat, see also the FDA Trans Fat page.

EU Situation

In EU art. 30.7 of the FIC Regulation (“Food Information to Consumers” Reg. (EU) n. 1169/2011) says that “by 13 December 2014, the Commission, taking into account scientific evidence and experience acquired in Member States, shall submit a report on the presence of trans fats in foods and in the overall diet of the Union population. The aim of the report shall be to assess the impact of appropriate means that could enable consumers to make healthier food and overall dietary choices or that could promote the provision of healthier food options to consumers, including, among others, the provision of information on trans fats to consumers or restrictions on their use. The Commission shall accompany this report with a legislative proposal, if appropriate.”

Today the report has not been submitted yet and the Commission has been deeply criticized, especially from consumers associations for the unexpected delay. As a matter of fact in this situation is not even possible to declare voluntary the trans fat value in the EU format of the nutrition declaration (while in USA is mandatory from 2006).

Here below, you can find the definition of Trans fatty acids (TFA) and the advice given by EFSA in a 2010 Scientific Opinion:

“Trans fatty acids are not synthesised by the human body and are not required in the diet. Therefore, no Population Reference Intake, Average Requirement, or Adequate Intake is set. Consumption of diets containing trans-monounsaturated fatty acids, like diets containing mixtures of saturated fatty acids, increases blood total and LDL cholesterol concentrations in a dose-dependent manner, compared with consumption of diets containing cis-monounsaturated fatty acids or cispolyunsaturated fatty acids. Consumption of diets containing trans-monounsaturated fatty acids also results in reduced blood HDL cholesterol concentrations and increases the total cholesterol to HDL cholesterol ratio. The available evidence indicates that trans fatty acids from ruminant sources have adverse effects on blood lipids and lipoproteins similar to those from industrial sources when consumed in equal amounts. Prospective cohort studies show a consistent relationship between higher intakes of trans fatty acids and increased risk of coronary heart disease. The available evidence is insufficient to establish whether there is a difference between ruminant and industrial trans fatty acids consumed in equivalent amounts on the risk of coronary heart disease. Dietary trans fatty acids are provided by several fats and oils that are also important sources of essential fatty acids and other nutrients. Thus, there is a limit to which the intake of trans fatty acids can be lowered without compromising adequacy of intake of essential nutrients. Therefore, the Panel concludes that trans fatty acids intake should be as low as is possible within the context of a nutritionally adequate diet. Limiting the intake of trans fatty acids should be considered when establishing nutrient goals and recommendations.”

 

Food recalls in EU – Week 24/2015

Polenta5

This week on the EU RASFF (Rapid Alert System for Food and Feed) we can find the following notifications:

1. Alerts followed by a recall from consumers:

– Allergens: traces of gluten (presence) in variety of chocolate flavoured brownie cake bars from the United Kingdom, following company’s own check. Notified by United Kingdom, distributed also to Ireland;

– Foreign bodies: plastic fragments in milk chocolate bar with whole hazelnuts from Poland, following a consumer complaint. Notified by Germany;

– Heavy metals: mercury (1.55 mg/kg – ppm) in chilled vacuum packed swordfish fillets (Xiphias gladius) from Spain, following an official control on the market. Notified by Italy, distributed also to Austria;

– Mycotoxins: fumonisins (6738.8; 10500 µg/kg – ppb) in corn meal from Portugal, following an official control on the market. Notified by Luxembourg;

– Pathogenic micro-organisms: Salmonella spp. (presence/25g) in food for enteral use for children from the Netherlands, following an official control on the market. Notified by Germany;

2. Information for attention/for follow up followed by a recall from consumers:

– Foreign bodies: glass fragments in wine from South Africa, following company’s own check. Notified by Ireland;

– Pathogenic micro-organisms: Campylobacter jejuni (11 positive samples: 800, 100,400, 200, 300, 3100, 9200, 400, 700, 600, 300 CFU/g) in fresh chicken from the Netherlands, following an official control on the market. Notified by Denmark, distributed also to Germany.

3. Alerts followed by a withdrawal from the market/from recipients:

– Composition: unauthorised substances progesterone (2.56 mg/kg – ppm) and androstenedione (3.02 mg/kg – ppm) in food supplement from India, via Latvia, following an official control on the market. Notified by Czech Republic;

– Composition: high content of iodine (2423 mg/kg – ppm) in dried seaweed from Japan, following an official control on the market. Notified by Germany, distributed also to Netherlands and United Kingdom;

– Industrial contaminants: benzo(a)pyrene (2.7 µg/kg – ppb) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH4 sum: 15.8 µg/kg – ppb) in chilled bacon from Latvia, following an official control on the market. Notified by Estonia;

– Mycotoxins: ochratoxin A (19.3 µg/kg – ppb) in raisins from Turkey, packaged in Poland, following an official control on the market. Notified by Poland, distributed also to United Kingdom;

– Pathogenic micro-organisms: Listeria monocytogenes (<10 CFU/g) in raw milk cheese from France, following company’s own check. Notified by France, distributed also to Belgium, Germany, Luxembourg, Netherlands and United Kingdom;

4. Seizures:

In Italy, following an official control on the market, we had a seizure for E 450 – diphosphate (2.37 g/kg) unauthorised in chilled vacuum packed yellow fin tuna from Spain.

5. Border rejections:

  • absence of health certificate(s) for curry leaves from India
  • aflatoxins (B1 = 11.6; Tot. = 13.1 µg/kg – ppb) in shelled peanuts, in blanched peanuts (B1 = 3.0 µg/kg – ppb), in blanched groundnut kernels (B1 = 4.5 µg/kg – ppb) and in groundnuts (Tot. = 8.7 µg/kg – ppb) from China
  • aflatoxins (B1 = 13.6; Tot. = 14.4 µg/kg – ppb) in chili powder from India
  • aflatoxins (B1 = 18.1; Tot. = 18.9 µg/kg – ppb) in shelled bitter almonds from Morocco
  • aflatoxins (B1 = 19; Tot. = 24 µg/kg – ppb) in shelled almonds from Australia
  • aflatoxins (B1 = 22.7; Tot. = 24.3 µg/kg – ppb) in pistachios in shell from the United States
  • aflatoxins (B1 = 4.6 µg/kg – ppb) in groundnuts from Brazil
  • aflatoxins (Tot. = 25 µg/kg – ppb) in shelled hazelnut from Turkey
  • chlorpyrifos (0.41 mg/kg – ppm) and dimethoate (1.9 mg/kg – ppm) and unauthorised substances profenofos (0.08 mg/kg – ppm) and dichlorvos (4.6 mg/kg – ppm) in dried beans from Nigeria
  • deoxynivalenol (DON) (1240 µg/kg – ppb) in popcorn from Bosnia and Herzegovina and in popcorn (2308 µg/kg – ppb) from Serbia
  • dried vegetables from China infested with moulds and with insects
  • fenamiphos (0.096 mg/kg – ppm) in fresh pepper from Turkey
  • poor hygienic state of red peppers from Tunisia
  • poor temperature control (> 12.2 °C) of chilled seabass (Dicentrarchus spp) and chilled tuna (Thunnus spp) from Mauritania
  • Salmonella spp. (presence /25g) in betel leaves from India
  • Salmonella Stanley and acephate (0.035 mg/kg – ppm) in frozen okra from Vietnam
  • too high content of colour E 102 – tartrazine, of colour E 122 – azorubine, of colour E 129 – Allura Red AC and of colour E 133 – Brilliant Blue FCF (combined level of dyes > 300 mg/kg – ppm) in marshmallows from China
  • unauthorised novel food ingredient Siraitia Grosvenorii in food supplement from the United States

(Source: EU RASFF Portal)

Book – Food waste: a multidisciplinary approach

cop

The monograph provides a multidisciplinary overview on food waste.

In a moment of fusions between different university departments, that aggregate scholars of different backgrounds, the ability to create dialogue and to integrate methodologies and proposals can lead to results more content-rich and scientifically more complex than those that individually could be reached.

It is with this purpose that are presented contributions on the subject of several scholars (experts in commodities, food technologists, statisticians and sociologists) that, thanks to their skills, contribute to outline the scenario in which consumers and companies have to act.

The underlying theme is the identification of tools and strategies that the food business operators and consumers can implement in order to contain the waste. Aim of the study, therefore, is not only to identify ways of managing food waste once it has been created, but also to offer something to think about how this can be prevented.

Edited by Erica Varese – co-authors: Valentina Alessandria, Alessandro Bonadonna, Stefania Buffagni, Anna Lo Presti, Maria Cristina Martinengo, Luca Giorgio Carlo Rolle, Erica Varese, Giuseppe Zeppa, Anna Zimelli.

You can buy the book here and download the brochure (in Italian) here.

FVO report – Canada: meat and meat products for export in EU

doublerafter-cattle-drives

The report describes the outcome of an audit carried out by the Food and Veterinary Office (FVO) in Canada from 2 to 15 May 2014.

The objective of the audit was to evaluate the capacity of the Canadian competent authorities (CA), the Canadian Food Safety Authority (CFIA) to implement and to enforce the sanitary measures and the control systems put in place to fulfil the requirements for fresh meat, meat products, minced meat and meat preparations and casings for human consumption intended for export to the European Union (EU) under the auspices of the “Agreement between the European Community and Canada on sanitary measures to protect public health and animal health in respect of trade in live animals and animal products.” The initial scope of the audit was extended to cover also the official controls in relation to veterinary medicinal products (VMP) and residues in live horses and horse meat.

The FVO audit team visited five slaughterhouses with integrated cutting plants (two of these visited by both sub-teams on different days for horses or bovines/bison) and one casing establishment. The FVO audit team also visited one border crossing (horses imported from the USA), three feed lots (horse, bovine and bison), one wholesaler and one retailer of VMPs as well as one CFIA area office.

No major problems were identified in relation to general and specific hygiene requirements in any of the slaughter establishments visited. However, the casing establishment which was not exporting to the EU at the time of the FVO audit did not fulfil the requirements for EU listing. The CFIA does not ensure that the lists of establishments approved for export to the EU are kept up to date and communicated to the Commission as required. After the FVO audit was announced several requests for de-listing of establishments were made by the CA.

The FVO audit also identified shortcomings in relation to official controls over the traceability of bovine animals and bison destined for export to the EU.

No shortcomings were identified in relation to the implementation of the CFIA Ractopamine-Free Pork Certification Programme. The Growth Enhancement Products (GEP) free programme for bovines and bison is well documented but deficiencies in the design and the implementation of the programme question its robustness.

There are serious concerns in relation to the reliability of the controls over both imported and domestic horses destined for export to the EU. It cannot be guaranteed that horses have not been treated with illegal substances within the last 180 days before slaughter.

The residue monitoring in horse meat has been largely implemented as foreseen and in line with Codex Alimentarius requirements but the effectiveness of follow-up of non-compliant results has been variable. Whilst the CFIA puts the responsibility for follow-up of non-compliances largely on the shoulders of the slaughterhouses, the CFIA does not always fulfil its obligations for verifying and ensuring the effectiveness of the follow-up investigations and corrective actions. The CFIA is in this regard hampered by a lack of direct powers over primary producers and transient agents (dealers).

Here you can find the response from the Competent Authority to the report recommendations.

Food recalls in EU – Week 23/2015

dried_licorice_roots_premium_hand_selected

This week on the EU RASFF (Rapid Alert System for Food and Feed) we can find the following notifications:

1. Alerts followed by a recall from consumers:

– Biocontaminants: atropine (198.5 µg/kg – ppb) and scopolamine (45 µg/kg – ppb) in organic polenta cornmeal from Germany, following an official control on the market. Notified by Germany, distributed also to Austria;

– Foreign bodies: glass fragments in white wine in bottle from South Africa, following company’s own check. Notified by Finland, distributed also to Denmark and Sweden;

– Foreign bodies: plastic fragments (size 7-17 by 5-14 mm) in frozen fish cutlets from Germany, following a consumer complaint. Notified by Netherlands;

– Foreign bodies: wire 1.5 cm long in chocolate bar from Germany, following a consumer complaint. Notified by Germany, distributed also to Austria, Italy, Luxembourg, Spain and Switzerland;

– Mycotoxins: ochratoxin A (433.5 µg/kg – ppb) in liquorice root from Turkey, via the United Kingdom, following an official control on the market. Notified by Ireland;

– Pathogenic micro-organisms: Listeria monocytogenes (presence/25g) in raw milk cheeses from France, following an official control on the market. Notified by France, distributed also to Denmark, Netherlands and Spain;

– Pathogenic micro-organisms: norovirus (GI /25g) in frozen raspberries from Serbia, via Belgium, following an official control on the market. Notified by France;

– Pathogenic micro-organisms: shigatoxin-producing Escherichia coli (H11, eae+, stx1+) in frozen burgers from Spain, following company’s own check. Notified by France, distributed also to Monaco.

2. Information for attention/for follow up followed by a recall from consumers:

None.

3. Alerts followed by a withdrawal from the market:

– Biocontaminants: histamine (1100 mg/kg – ppm) in frozen tuna steak from Vietnam, following company’s own check. Notified by Belgium, distributed also to Estonia, Slovakia, Finland and Sweden;

– Foreign bodies: glass fragments (very small glass particles) in wine from South Africa, following company’s own check. Notified by Netherlands, distributed also to Italy;

– Heavy metals: mercury (0.5 mg/kg – ppm) in five-flavour berry (Schisandra chinensis) from Singapore, via the Netherlands, following an official control on the market. Notified by Sweden, distributed also to Finland, Germany and Italy;

– Mycotoxins: deoxynivalenol (DON) (2198 µg/kg – ppb) in salted popcorn manufactured in the Czech Republic, with raw material from Hungary, following an official control on the market. Notified by Poland, distributed also to Germany;

– Pathogenic micro-organisms: Listeria monocytogenes (3100 CFU/g) in smoked mackerel processed in Romania, with raw material from Spain, following an official control on the market. Notified by Hungary;

– Pathogenic micro-organisms: Listeria monocytogenes (400 CFU/g) in gorgonzola cheese from Italy, following an official control on the market. Notified by Switzerland, distributed also to France;

– Pathogenic micro-organisms: Salmonella spp. (presence/25g) in ginger from the United Kingdom, with raw material from Nigeria, following an official control on the market. Notified by Netherlands;

– Pesticide residues: ethephon (2.9 mg/kg – ppm) in pineapples from Mauritius, following company’s own check. Notified by Netherlands, distributed also to Romania.

4. Seizures:

None.

5. Border rejections:

  • aflatoxins (B1 = 16.4; Tot. = 17.4 µg/kg – ppb) in dried whole red chilli peppers from India
  • aflatoxins (B1 = 193; Tot. = 225 µg/kg – ppb) in groundnuts from India, processed in Egypt
  • aflatoxins (B1 = 96.9; Tot. = 152 µg/kg – ppb) in pistachios in shell and in pistachio kernels (B1 = 20; Tot. = 22 / B1 = 71; Tot. = 80 µg/kg – ppb) from the United States
  • biphenyl (1.66 mg/kg – ppm) in lemons from Turkey
  • dithiocarbamates (0.15 mg/kg – ppm) in vine leaves from Turkey
  • FEED: arsenic (220 mg/kg – ppm) in manganese oxide from India
  • FEED: aflatoxins (B1 = 189 µg/kg – ppb) in groundnut kernels for bird feed from the Gambia
  • fraudulent health certificate(s) (dated after the arrival to the BIP) for refined hazelnut oil from Turkey
  • Salmonella spp. (presence /25g) in frozen shrimps (Penaeus vannamei) from Vietnam
  • too high content of sulphite and undeclared sulphite (4958 mg/kg – ppm) in dried apricots from Turkey, via Lebanon
  • undeclared milk ingredient, wheat and nuts in and insufficient labelling of sesame seed-based confectionery (barazeq) from Lebanon

E-Book – FDA Requirements in a nutshell

FDA-food-labeling-requirements-ebook

Very similarly to EU, many new food business owners get discouraged when they see how confusing it is to decipher FDA’s regulations on proper food product labeling. The website is so extensive and regulations so numerous, that it seems impossible to read through all of them. And that’s not all. When you start reading frequently asked questions by food producers, or when you visit forums on this topic in the Internet, you realize there are many ambiguities that can be resolved only by consulting an expert. Anyway, e-book and guidelines are useful resources to have at least a general idea of the task.

Recently I found the following e-book, which tries to simplify FDA’s regulations and summarize the basics of food labeling in a visually engaging, easy-to-understand way. It shows you that the common food packaging label is made up of five parts: statement of identity, the product’s net weight, your address, ingredients list and nutrition facts. Further you’ll learn what every nutrition facts label needs to have and where it needs to be placed in order to be always visible to the consumer. The text is full of links to relevant FDA website pages.

Food producers can be exempted from food labeling and this ebook provides links to particular pages that explain how a food business owner can apply for exemption (for example, if the business is small and doesn’t exceed a certain amount of profit per year).

This ebook can also be helpful to consumers, because they often don’t realize the importance of a food label, the trouble a food producer goes through to accurately inform buyers about their product, and the real meanings of some information.

You can download the ebook and become a bit more knowledgeable about the USA food labelling.

FVO Report – Latvia – Post slaughter traceability of meat and meat products

Carni

The audit to Latvia was carried out from 1 to 12 December 2014. The main objective of the audit was to evaluate the operation of official controls over the traceability of meat (meat of domestic ungulates, poultry, lagomorphs and game meat), minced meat, mechanically separated meat (MSM), meat preparations, meat products (hereafter referred to as meat and products thereof), and composite products containing meat and products thereof and other ingredients. Particular attention was paid to the traceability, labelling and identification systems of meat and products thereof, and to composite products containing meat and products thereof and traceability of quantities of each ingredient used.

The Competent Authorities (CAs) responsible for official controls in the scope of the audit have been designated in compliance with Article 4(1) of Regulation (EC) No 882/2004 and within the scope of this audit, Union legislation is transposed, where applicable into national legislation.

Within the scope of the audit, the official control plans are implemented as foreseen and official controls are carried out in accordance with documented procedures. The CA controls did not include systematic controls on quantitative traceability (quantities of meat and products thereof and other ingredients, received, used, dispatched and in stock) or an in-depth verification of Food Business Operator’s (FBO’s) traceability procedures.

While the routine CA controls found some non-compliances regarding traceability, labelling and use of additives, the controls did not detect a number of more serious, systemic deficiencies. The CA control results for each of the 14 samples taken at retail level at the start of the Food and Veterinary Office’s (FVO) audit indicated non compliances related to traceability, labelling and/or use of additives. The CA control results indicated that Regulation (EU) No 931/2011 was not implemented correctly in many cases.

In one establishment, the product labels for wild game meat contained misleading information for the final consumer and traceability was not guaranteed. The CA initiated immediate corrective actions, including product suspension.

Rome 19th June 2015 – Practical seminar: how to defend your business from official controls and food frauds

Colosseo, Roma

On 19th June 2015 I will be in Rome for a full day practical seminar on how to defend your business from official controls, non compliance events and food frauds. The course is hosted and organized by Eurofishmarketleading firm specialized in marketing, training and legal services on seafood sector, and SIMeVeP (Italian

Aim of the course is to offer to the food business operators the instruments to comprehend which are their rights and their obligations during the official controls and the administrative and/or criminal proceedings which follow the non-compliance.

We will analyze the main issues linked to the sampling and testing phase and how to manage an inspection from the competent authority, which kind of measures the competent authorities can apply (i.e. seizures), how to handle a food recall and how to prevent unintentional frauds (i.e. Horsemeat scandal), with practical examples.

The EU Commission is working on a revision of the Reg. (CE) n. 882/2004 on official controls on foodstuffs, and within this context is also evaluating if establishing a common definition of “food frauds” and how to build a credible enforcement system to prevent such incidents.

It is of pivotal importance to be updated on those aspects, since the publication of the new Regulation (in origin fixed for the end of 2015) probably will be in the first half of 2016.

You can see the full program and subscribe here.

Language of the course: Italian. For readers from foreign countries I remember that I can organize also sessions via webinar/distance learning.

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