New Natural Liquid Extract Line for Flavor and Sensory Boost

Frutarom BU Health, Switzerland, launches EFLA®sense, a new line of all-natural liquid exctracts, with sensory properties to boost flavor and health benefits in products such as beverages, confectionary, dairy, bakery and liquid dietary supplements.

The use of herbal extracts is an emerging ingredient trend for many market categories according to global product launch activity tracked by Innova Market Insights. There was a 4% increase in global tracked product launches containing herbal extracts in 2014 from 2013, with more future growth anticipated. Supplements was the most active market category for herbal extract applications in 2014, accounting for 11.5% of global product launch activity tracked, followed by Sauces & Seasonings (6.8%), Ready Meals (5.9%) and Soft Drinks (4.9%).

EFLA®sense line contains natural botanic extracts from flowers (including chamomile, elderflower and orange blossom); leaves (peppermint, lemon balm and sage); fruits and seeds (fennel and rose hips) and several herbal blends. These essences are obtained from traditional plants and meet the increasing consumer demand for health and wellness products and clean label. The new line is produced in Switzerland through a gentle process that preserves the delicate flavors and aromatic properties of the ingredients.

“The natural line provides healthy solutions to naturally enhance the taste of finished foods with nuances of flowers, herbs and other essences of nature, says Yannick Capelle, Product Manager for Frutarom BU Health. “We offer unique natural herbal extracts to help our customers reinvent their products and add healthy sensory appeal.”

EFLA®sense also is especially suitable for liquid supplement products such as “shots,” an excellent bridge between the emerging need for health-promoting nutraceuticals and the inconvenience of swallowing a large number of tablets. The healthy flavor extracts have a typical dosage of 0.1-0.2% and are heat- and pH-stable.

“We carefully select our raw materials and rigorously control the supply chain and production to ensure high purity and quality of our plant extracts,” explains Capelle. “Frutarom BU health has strict protocols for quality and safety assessment in order to provide customers the best sustainable flavor line while enabling clean label capacity.

Written Q&A to EU Commission – Organic labeling and counterfeiting

Question for written answer
to the Commission
Rule 130
Nicola Caputo (S&D)

3rd September 2014

Subject:  Labelling of organic foods and counterfeit products

As demand for organic and protected geographical indication (PGI) products rises dramatically, the quantity of fraudulent products on the market is rising with it: hundreds of products are being passed off as organic foods subject to rigorous checks but have in fact been falsely labelled and produced with complete disregard for the rules, using harmful pesticides, non-comestible liquids or even substances intended for use in animal feed.

1. How does the Commission intend to boost organic food production in an effort to satisfy demand without sacrificing quality?

2. In the context of the EU proposal on the labelling of organic products, what monitoring systems could be used to clamp down on counterfeit foods?

3. How does the Commission plan to tackle the increasing use of e-commerce to export ‘fake organic’ products quickly and on a huge scale, and to import counterfeit products?

Answer given by Mr Cioloş on behalf of the Commission – 20th October 2014

1. The Common agricultural policy (CAP) includes measures to support organic production. From 2015, Member States will have to use 30% of direct payments to finance payments to farmers for sustainable agricultural practices that are beneficial for climate and environment. The practices of an organic farmer will be considered per se as complying with these so-called greening payments. Rural development framework includes opportunities to support increase of organic production, as a specific measure provides for Member States to support farmers converting to, or maintaining, organic production practices. The School Fruit and Vegetables Scheme (SFVS) and the School Milk Scheme (SMS) present opportunities for organic farmers.

Research and innovation has a role to play in development of EU organics, and to this end the action plan for the future of Organic Production in the European Union(1) foresees actions under Horizon 2020 to support research and innovation. The European Innovation Partnership for agriculture will also foster the exchange of innovative methods and research results and make the link between science and practice.

2. The proposal allocates a budget for technical assistance measures by the Commission so as to implement a system of electronic certification, both for products imported and for EU operators. This will make forgery and fraud, currently found in paper documents, more difficult and will enhance traceability and control.

3. As part of its Action Plan1 the Commission will assist Member States in developing and implementing an organic fraud prevention policy, through targeted workshops to share good practices and the development of compendia/casebook of cases.

(1) COM(2014)179 final ; http://ec.europa.eu/agriculture/organic/documents/eu-policy/european-action-plan/act_en.pdf

(Source: European Parliament website)