Products’ safety self declaration in Vietnam?

Decree No 15, effective since 2 February, 2018, will permit organisations and individuals producing and selling food to self-declare food-product origins and quality, replacing the long-standing method of keeping records at public management agencies and ask for authorizations.

According to local businesses, in the past, to apply for the certificate, an enterprise must prepare two sets of documents and each set had 11 different kinds of papers.

According to a survey of the Central Institute for Economic Management announced recently said that to apply for a food safety hygiene certificate, each enterprise must pay about VN$10 million (US$440), and VN$30 million (US$1,300) in some cases.

(Source: Vietnam Net, Vietnam Plus)

I am totally against the meaningless bureaucracy and very well aware of the global trend of shifting responsibilities to the food business operators and enhancing private-public cooperation control models: this is the future, since the competent authorities won’t have the means and the budgets to check everything. The number of checks to perform is too high and the type of controls too wide.

But, in a country where the food safety average level is still one of the worst worldwide (see one of the thousands of articles regarding the topic: link) maybe this is a too bald move: Vietnam, according to the above mentioned trend, is also strengthening the criminal and administrative sanctions for food safety violations and reviewing the existing food legislation, to protect domestic consumers and meet the strictest requirements of some importing countries (like the EU block itself).

My doubt is that in an environment still not characterized by a solid business culture, this decision would be a step back on this road.

 

FDA Releases Final Guidance for Voluntary Qualified Importer Program

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is announcing final guidance for industry for a voluntary, fee-based program to allow the expedited review and importation of foods into the United States from importers with a proven track record of food safety and security. The final guidance is in question-and-answer format to explain how this program will work.

In particular the document address the following points:

  • The benefits VQIP importers can expect to receive;
  • The eligibility criteria for VQIP participation;
  • Instructions for completing a VQIP application;
  • Conditions that may result in revocation of participation in VQIP; and
  • Criteria for VQIP reinstatement following revocation.

The Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA), indeed, required FDA to establish a voluntary, fee-based program for the expedited review and importation of foods from importers who achieve and maintain a high level of control over the safety and security of their supply chains. This control includes importation of food from facilities that have been certified in accordance with FDA’s program for Accreditation of Third-Party Certification Bodies to Conduct Food Safety Audits and to Issue Certifications (see FDA’s third-party certification regulations at 21 CFR part 1, subpart M), as well as other measures that support a high level of confidence in the safety and security of the food they import. Expedited entry incentivizes importers to adopt a robust system of supply chain management and further benefits public health by allowing FDA to focus its resources on food entries that pose a higher risk to public health.

Speaking of benefits for companies, they will be the following:

• FDA will expedite entry into the United States for all foods included in an approved VQIP application (VQIP foods). FDA will set screening in its Predictive Risk-based Evaluation for Dynamic Import Compliance Targeting (PREDICT) import screening system to recognize shipments of food which are the subject of an approved VQIP application to expedite the entry of such food. The system is designed to recognize the information and release the shipment immediately after the receipt of entry information, unless examination and sampling are necessary for public health reasons. (See Question A.5.)

• FDA will limit examination and/or sampling of VQIP food entries to “for cause” situations (i.e., when the food is or may be associated with a risk to the public health), to obtain statistically necessary risk-based microbiological samples, and to audit VQIP. (See Question A.5.)

• In the examination and/or sampling circumstances identified in the previous bullet, FDA will attempt, to the extent possible, to examine an entry and collect samples at the VQIP food destination or other location preferred by the VQIP importer. If exportation is warranted, FDA will assist in fulfilling an importer’s request to U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) to export from the port preferred by the importer.

• FDA will expedite its laboratory analysis of “for cause” or audit samples of VQIP entries, to the extent possible in accordance with public health priorities.

• FDA will maintain a VQIP Importers Help Desk dedicated to responding to questions and resolving issues raised by VQIP importers about VQIP food and this guidance document. The VQIP Importers Help Desk will be available for assistance with completing the VQIP application and facilitating review of VQIP food that does not receive an immediate release.

• FDA will post a publicly available list of approved VQIP importers on FDA’s VQIP Web page. VQIP importers may choose not to be listed on the VQIP importers list. A VQIP importer’s decision to opt out of being listed on the publicly available list of approved VQIP importers will not have any effect on its participation.

Additional Information