FDA Releases Compliance Guide for Small Businesses under FSMA Intentional Adulteration Rule (Food defense)

Small Entity Compliance Guides (SECGs) are designed to help small businesses meet federal standards. They are among the resources that the FDA is providing to support compliance with the new FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) standards.

The FDA announced today the availability of an SECG to help small businesses comply with the Final Rule on Mitigation Strategies to Protect Food Against Intentional Adulteration (or Intentional Adulteration Rule), mandated by FSMA.

The SECG was prepared in accordance with the Small Business Regulatory Enforcement and Fairness Act. It provides nonbinding recommendations on such topics as developing a food defense plan and records management.

The compliance date for small businesses under the Intentional Adulteration Rule is July 27, 2020. Very small businesses are exempt from the rule, except for a documentation requirement described in the SECG, which has a compliance date of July 26, 2021.

Here you can find also an FDA fact sheet on the final rule on food defense.

The FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) final rule is aimed at preventing intentional adulteration from acts intended to cause wide-scale harm to public health, including acts of terrorism targeting the food supply. Such acts, while not likely to occur, could cause illness, death, economic disruption of the food supply absent mitigation strategies.

Rather than targeting specific foods or hazards, this rule requires mitigation (risk-reducing) strategies for processes in certain registered food facilities.

The proposed rule was issued in December 2013. The changes in the final rule are largely designed to provide either more information, where stakeholders requested it, or greater flexibility for food facilities in determining how they will assess their facilities, implement mitigation strategies, and ensure that the mitigation strategies are working as intended.

In developing the rule, FDA interacted with the intelligence community and considered vulnerability assessments conducted in collaboration with the food industry.
While acts of intentional adulteration may many other forms, including acts of disgruntled employees or economically motivated adulteration, the goal of this rule is to prevent acts intended to cause wide-scale harm. Economic adulteration, on the contrary,  is addressed in the final preventive controls rules for human and animal foods.

We already treated food defense topic in a previous post regarding EU situation.

Foodlawlatest.com Top Ten 2016 Articles

Another year passed and thank you again to all my readers and followers for keep sharing and liking my posts.

In case you missed them, here you can find the link to the 10 most read articles from 2016.

  1. EFSA report on emerging risk – Plastic rice frauds listed

2. Food Labeling Contrast between China and EU Regulations (Part I)

3. Guidance document describing the food categories of Regulation (EC) No 1333/2008 on Food Additives – Updated February 2016

4. Food Fraud: An in depth discussion of new EU Regulation on official checks on food

5. Acrylamide evaluations in EU and USA – FDA Final Guidance on reduction in certain foods

6. Summer Academy in Global Food Law and Policy 2016

  1. Food Labeling Contrast between China and EU Regulations (Part II)

8. Entry-Exit Alerts for Chinese Food Market (Part 2) – Bird’s nests update

9. The Italian Law against food waste

  1. EU Preliminary Impact Assessment on Trans Fats policy options