FVO Report – Sweden official controls over meat traceability and food frauds

The audit to Sweden was carried out from 14 to 24 April 2015. The main objective of the audit was to evaluate the operation of official controls over the traceability of meat (meat of domestic ungulates, poultry, lagomorphs and game meat), minced meat, mechanically separated meat (MSM), meat preparations, meat products (hereafter referred to as meat and products thereof), and composite products containing meat and products thereof and other ingredients.

Particular attention was paid to the traceability, labelling and identification systems of meat and products thereof, and to composite products containing meat and products thereof and traceability of quantities of each ingredient used. The official control procedures require all establishments to be controlled, at least every five years, in all areas of applicable legislation. Risk based controls are split between the different inspections/audits that take place during the five year period. In the current five year official control plan traceability is scheduled to be covered twice.

The CCA is currently implementing actions in relation to traceability following the horse meat scandal and the discovery of certain food fraud in Sweden. These actions aim to increase the awareness of FBOs and officials in charge of controls. They concern the following areas:

  • creation of a food fraud unit;
  • specific training for staff to new control methods (180 inspectors on training);
  • identification of non-registered FBOs;
  • revision of the Swedish food act to re-enforce its efficiency, particularly concerning penal sanctions;
  • joint NFA-Stockholm municipality project to improve traceability controls and avoid overlapping (to be carried out between May and September 2015).

The Swedish CCA has already drawn certain lessons from the recent meat scandals and is undertaking specific actions to increase the efficiency of the control system. Significant work remains to be done.

In all the establishments visited, the food business operators stated that a traceability system was in place. However, the evaluation of these systems revealed a less positive picture concerning traceability in general and quantitative traceability in particular. In one cold store a robust traceability system was already in place. Two establishments were making good progress towards implementing a good system but the others still had significant progress to make. Two establishments had yet to start work on implementing a traceability system.

At the start of the audit, the FVO audit team chose 14 different food (meat based) samples at retail level. The CCA was asked to carry out a quantitative traceability of these samples in co-operation with the FBOs concerned. These exercises were far from successful: out of 14 samples, the CAs and the FBOs concerned could only establish 4 complete chains of traceability supported by the documented evidence. In the other cases significant documents relating to traceability were missing.

The FVO audit team also paid attention to the traceability and the use of additives in meat preparations and meat products. In general the situation was satisfactory but certain misuses were noted in some establishments. Nitrites and phosphates are allowed in “traditional products” which, in the absence of specific national rules/guidance, has the potential to include any pork or beef meat injected with curing solution (including in the initial phase of the maturing process).

The report makes a number of recommendations to the Swedish CA with a view to addressing the deficiencies identified during this audit.

FVO report – Poland – Poultry meat shortcomings identified

This report describes the outcome of a Food and Veterinary Office audit in Poland. The audit took place from 18 to 28 November 2014 to assess whether the organization of the competent authorities and the implementation of national provisions in respect of controls on poultry meat and products derived therefrom comply with EU requirements.

The report concludes that Poland has in place an organised official control system based on EU and national legislation, supported by a number of Central Competent Authority instructions and guidelines. In general, this control system is applied consistently over time and covers the entire poultry production chain.

However some shortcomings in the implementation of the official control system were noted with respect to:

• The insufficient supervision and control of the use of food additives and the labelling of mechanically separated meat;

• Shortcomings at establishment level detected by the FVO audit team but had not previously been noted during official controls;

• The actions taken by the Competent Authorities in cases of positive results after official Salmonella sampling, particularly in order to prevent recurrence of these situations;

• The application of National measures not in line with EU rules, in relation to the adaptation of the requirements of Regulation (EC) No 853/2004 in low production establishments.

The report includes a number of recommendations addressed to the central competent authority, aimed at rectifying the shortcomings identified and enhancing the implementation of official control system in place.

(Source: DG Sante website)