Foodlawlatest.com Top Ten 2016 Articles

Another year passed and thank you again to all my readers and followers for keep sharing and liking my posts.

In case you missed them, here you can find the link to the 10 most read articles from 2016.

  1. EFSA report on emerging risk – Plastic rice frauds listed

2. Food Labeling Contrast between China and EU Regulations (Part I)

3. Guidance document describing the food categories of Regulation (EC) No 1333/2008 on Food Additives – Updated February 2016

4. Food Fraud: An in depth discussion of new EU Regulation on official checks on food

5. Acrylamide evaluations in EU and USA – FDA Final Guidance on reduction in certain foods

6. Summer Academy in Global Food Law and Policy 2016

  1. Food Labeling Contrast between China and EU Regulations (Part II)

8. Entry-Exit Alerts for Chinese Food Market (Part 2) – Bird’s nests update

9. The Italian Law against food waste

  1. EU Preliminary Impact Assessment on Trans Fats policy options

Entry-Exit Alerts for Chinese Market

Today I introduce you with great pleasure a guest writer which hopefully will be a fixed presence on foodlawlatest.com: Quinn Hulk, Food and Drug Administration of Beijing – Food Law Advisor.

With his solid background in food safety and his role in the competent authority, he will be in future Foodlawlatest country contributor for China and will offer us incredibly useful oversights on the Chinese food safety issues. The following analysis of the recent Chinese import alerts speaks for him.

You can contact Quinn Hulk directly via e-mail at hulkquinn@163.com.

China has become the largest food and farm produce importer all over the world. With the total value of imported food and farm produce rising to 121, 48 billion dollar in 2014 from 37, 57 billion dollar in 2001, it seems that Chinese consumers have more assurance in imported food. Great news for the food and farm produce traders. Risks, however, are an indispensable part of chances. Things can still be done nonetheless. Here are some alerts.

a) According to the data released by Import & Export Food Safety Bureau affiliated to General Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine of PRC, the leading three among the areas from which the unqualified food come are Chinese Taiwan, European union countries and Southeast Asia.

The top ten factors for not being successfully penetrating into Chinese market are listed as below,

1) Defective labeling→Please refer to detailed provisions of Chinese national food safety standard GB7718-2011and GB28050-2011

2) Aerobic plate count→Please refer to detailed provisions of Chinese national food safety standard GB4789.2-2010

3) Enumeration of coliforms→Please refer to detailed provisions of Chinese national food safety standard GB4789.2-2010

4) Quality guarantee period→Please refer to detailed provisions of Chinese Food Safety Law

5) Wrong way in submission of relevant documents and materials→Please refer to detailed provisions of 35 provincial entry-exit inspection and quarantine bureaus of China and Import & Export Food Safety Bureau affiliated to General Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine of PRC

6) Moisture→Please refer to detailed provisions of Chinese national food safety standard GB5009.3-2010

7) Lack of credentials→Please refer to detailed provisions of 35 provincial entry-exit inspection and quarantine bureaus of China and Import & Export Food Safety Bureau affiliated to General Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine of PRC

8) Mould→Please refer to detailed provisions of Chinese national food safety standard GB478915-2010

9) Quality defects

10) Unauthorized admittance→Please refer to detailed provisions of 35 provincial entry-exit inspection and quarantine bureaus of China and Import & Export Food Safety Bureau affiliated to General Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine of PRC.

b) The top three types of food that failed in inspections conducted by Chinese customs are biscuits, beverages and alcohol.

For the biscuits, the main reasons that led to the failure are as follows,

1) Usage of food additives that fall out the legal range of Chinese regulations on food additives, mainly GB2760-2014.

2) Aerobic plate count goes beyond of GB4789.2-2010

3) Enumeration of coliforms is not in conformity with GB4789.2-2010.

4) The labeling is not in accordance with GB7718-2011 and GB28050-2011.

For beverages, the main reason of over 230 failures is that the products are detected of over used food additives, such as azorubin which is regulated by GB28309-2012.

For alcohol especially wines and beers, many brands from France, Greece, Germany, Spain and other European countries failed in food additives such as Iron oxide red, acesulfame potassium, Vitamin C. Other reasons included labeling, inconsistencies between documents and letter of credit, and failure in providing required documents and credentials.