Entry-Exit Alerts for Chinese Market

Today I introduce you with great pleasure a guest writer which hopefully will be a fixed presence on foodlawlatest.com: Quinn Hulk, Food and Drug Administration of Beijing – Food Law Advisor.

With his solid background in food safety and his role in the competent authority, he will be in future Foodlawlatest country contributor for China and will offer us incredibly useful oversights on the Chinese food safety issues. The following analysis of the recent Chinese import alerts speaks for him.

You can contact Quinn Hulk directly via e-mail at hulkquinn@163.com.

China has become the largest food and farm produce importer all over the world. With the total value of imported food and farm produce rising to 121, 48 billion dollar in 2014 from 37, 57 billion dollar in 2001, it seems that Chinese consumers have more assurance in imported food. Great news for the food and farm produce traders. Risks, however, are an indispensable part of chances. Things can still be done nonetheless. Here are some alerts.

a) According to the data released by Import & Export Food Safety Bureau affiliated to General Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine of PRC, the leading three among the areas from which the unqualified food come are Chinese Taiwan, European union countries and Southeast Asia.

The top ten factors for not being successfully penetrating into Chinese market are listed as below,

1) Defective labeling→Please refer to detailed provisions of Chinese national food safety standard GB7718-2011and GB28050-2011

2) Aerobic plate count→Please refer to detailed provisions of Chinese national food safety standard GB4789.2-2010

3) Enumeration of coliforms→Please refer to detailed provisions of Chinese national food safety standard GB4789.2-2010

4) Quality guarantee period→Please refer to detailed provisions of Chinese Food Safety Law

5) Wrong way in submission of relevant documents and materials→Please refer to detailed provisions of 35 provincial entry-exit inspection and quarantine bureaus of China and Import & Export Food Safety Bureau affiliated to General Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine of PRC

6) Moisture→Please refer to detailed provisions of Chinese national food safety standard GB5009.3-2010

7) Lack of credentials→Please refer to detailed provisions of 35 provincial entry-exit inspection and quarantine bureaus of China and Import & Export Food Safety Bureau affiliated to General Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine of PRC

8) Mould→Please refer to detailed provisions of Chinese national food safety standard GB478915-2010

9) Quality defects

10) Unauthorized admittance→Please refer to detailed provisions of 35 provincial entry-exit inspection and quarantine bureaus of China and Import & Export Food Safety Bureau affiliated to General Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine of PRC.

b) The top three types of food that failed in inspections conducted by Chinese customs are biscuits, beverages and alcohol.

For the biscuits, the main reasons that led to the failure are as follows,

1) Usage of food additives that fall out the legal range of Chinese regulations on food additives, mainly GB2760-2014.

2) Aerobic plate count goes beyond of GB4789.2-2010

3) Enumeration of coliforms is not in conformity with GB4789.2-2010.

4) The labeling is not in accordance with GB7718-2011 and GB28050-2011.

For beverages, the main reason of over 230 failures is that the products are detected of over used food additives, such as azorubin which is regulated by GB28309-2012.

For alcohol especially wines and beers, many brands from France, Greece, Germany, Spain and other European countries failed in food additives such as Iron oxide red, acesulfame potassium, Vitamin C. Other reasons included labeling, inconsistencies between documents and letter of credit, and failure in providing required documents and credentials.

New Incaberrix Superberry ingredients targets beverage market

Frutarom BU Health, Switzerland, launches its new superberry ingredient, IncaberrixTM. The water-soluble extract, rich in phytonutrients, is prepared from the ancient Andean physalis fruit (Physalis peruviana), also known as Inca berry, cape gooseberry or golden berry.

Inca berry is considered one of the “lost” crops of the Incans. It is native to the Andes, where it has been cultivated since ancient times. Many traditional Andean foods have an historic association with improved health and longevity. Maca and quinoa are examples of Andean staple crops rich in phytonutrients that became recognized as “super foods” in recent years.

“Now is the time for Inca golden berries,” states Yannick Capelle, Product Manager for Frutarom Health. “The concentrated nutrient value adds health benefits, combined with fun and an exotic touch, to a wide range of food applications. But the sweet and tart berry’s primary category is beverages, including soft drinks, nutritional beverages and more. We strive to lead in market innovation by developing such natural ingredients that can both lead food and beverage trends and support health.”

Incaberrix is particularly rich in B-complex vitamins, protein and minerals such as iron, zinc and phosphorus. It also is high in vitamin C and carotenoids. Recent tests in Frutarom Innovation Center show that clear, water-soluble Incaberrix is stable in beverage applications.

“Superberry ingredients such as Incaberrix are attractive ingredients for product developers and manufacturers seeking to add value to their food and beverage products,” notes Capelle. ”The introduction of this new superberry extract by Frutarom is part of the company’s ongoing strategy to comprehensively serve the functional product market through our group synergies and goals. Incaberrix is another example of how Frutarom combines its strength in developing exotic flavors with healthy ingredients to offer its clients innovative, great-tasting product concepts,” concludes Capelle.