Entry-Exit Alerts for Chinese Market

Today I introduce you with great pleasure a guest writer which hopefully will be a fixed presence on foodlawlatest.com: Quinn Hulk, Food and Drug Administration of Beijing – Food Law Advisor.

With his solid background in food safety and his role in the competent authority, he will be in future Foodlawlatest country contributor for China and will offer us incredibly useful oversights on the Chinese food safety issues. The following analysis of the recent Chinese import alerts speaks for him.

You can contact Quinn Hulk directly via e-mail at hulkquinn@163.com.

China has become the largest food and farm produce importer all over the world. With the total value of imported food and farm produce rising to 121, 48 billion dollar in 2014 from 37, 57 billion dollar in 2001, it seems that Chinese consumers have more assurance in imported food. Great news for the food and farm produce traders. Risks, however, are an indispensable part of chances. Things can still be done nonetheless. Here are some alerts.

a) According to the data released by Import & Export Food Safety Bureau affiliated to General Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine of PRC, the leading three among the areas from which the unqualified food come are Chinese Taiwan, European union countries and Southeast Asia.

The top ten factors for not being successfully penetrating into Chinese market are listed as below,

1) Defective labeling→Please refer to detailed provisions of Chinese national food safety standard GB7718-2011and GB28050-2011

2) Aerobic plate count→Please refer to detailed provisions of Chinese national food safety standard GB4789.2-2010

3) Enumeration of coliforms→Please refer to detailed provisions of Chinese national food safety standard GB4789.2-2010

4) Quality guarantee period→Please refer to detailed provisions of Chinese Food Safety Law

5) Wrong way in submission of relevant documents and materials→Please refer to detailed provisions of 35 provincial entry-exit inspection and quarantine bureaus of China and Import & Export Food Safety Bureau affiliated to General Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine of PRC

6) Moisture→Please refer to detailed provisions of Chinese national food safety standard GB5009.3-2010

7) Lack of credentials→Please refer to detailed provisions of 35 provincial entry-exit inspection and quarantine bureaus of China and Import & Export Food Safety Bureau affiliated to General Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine of PRC

8) Mould→Please refer to detailed provisions of Chinese national food safety standard GB478915-2010

9) Quality defects

10) Unauthorized admittance→Please refer to detailed provisions of 35 provincial entry-exit inspection and quarantine bureaus of China and Import & Export Food Safety Bureau affiliated to General Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine of PRC.

b) The top three types of food that failed in inspections conducted by Chinese customs are biscuits, beverages and alcohol.

For the biscuits, the main reasons that led to the failure are as follows,

1) Usage of food additives that fall out the legal range of Chinese regulations on food additives, mainly GB2760-2014.

2) Aerobic plate count goes beyond of GB4789.2-2010

3) Enumeration of coliforms is not in conformity with GB4789.2-2010.

4) The labeling is not in accordance with GB7718-2011 and GB28050-2011.

For beverages, the main reason of over 230 failures is that the products are detected of over used food additives, such as azorubin which is regulated by GB28309-2012.

For alcohol especially wines and beers, many brands from France, Greece, Germany, Spain and other European countries failed in food additives such as Iron oxide red, acesulfame potassium, Vitamin C. Other reasons included labeling, inconsistencies between documents and letter of credit, and failure in providing required documents and credentials.

Food recalls in EU – Week 48/2015

This week on the EU RASFF (Rapid Alert System for Food and Feed) we can find the following notifications:

1. Alerts followed by a recall from consumers:

2. Information for attention/for follow up followed by a recall from consumers:

3. Alerts followed by a withdrawal from the market:

4. Seizures:

None.

5. Border rejections:

  • acetamiprid (0.081 mg/kg – ppm) in pomegranates from Turkey
  • aflatoxins (B1 = 125; Tot. = 147 / B1 = 47; Tot. = 53 µg/kg – ppb) in pistachios in shell from Iran
  • aflatoxins (B1 = 15.6; Tot. = 17.4 µg/kg – ppb) in pistachios from the United States
  • aflatoxins (B1 = 17.4; Tot. = 18.4 µg/kg – ppb) in chilli powder from Bangladesh
  • aflatoxins (B1 = 27.8; Tot. = 29.39 µg/kg – ppb) in organic hazelnuts, dried figs, (B1 = 32; Tot. = 36 / B1 = 99.1; Tot. = 162.3 / B1 = 16.3; Tot. = 17.29 µg/kg – ppb) in shelled hazelnuts (B1 = 64.95; Tot. = 75.06 µg/kg – ppb) and in crushed roasted hazelnuts (B1 = 7.4; Tot. = 22 / B1 = 9.6; Tot. = 22 µg/kg – ppb) from Turkey
  • aflatoxins (B1 = 7.8; Tot. = 8.8 µg/kg – ppb) in groundnuts from Argentina
  • aflatoxins (B1 = 9.0 µg/kg – ppb) in crushed chillies from India
  • copper (115 mg/kg – ppm) in vine leaves in brine from Turkey
  • FEED: aflatoxins (B1 = 60.3 µg/kg – ppb) in peanuts for bird feeding from Brazil
  • fenpropathrin (0.017 mg/kg – ppm) and imidacloprid (0.021 mg/kg – ppm) and unauthorised substance tolfenpyrad (0.11 mg/kg – ppm) in green tea from Turkey
  • fraudulent health certificate(s) for frozen barramundi fillets (Lates spp) from China
  • improper health certificate(s) for shrimps (Penaeus duorarum) from Côte d’Ivoire with improper packaging (too porous)
  • ivermectin (4.0 µg/kg – ppb) unauthorised in frozen barramundi (Lates spp) from Vietnam
  • mercury (0.78 mg/kg – ppm) in chilled John Dory (Zeus faber) from Tunisia
  • poor temperature control of frozen Argentine red shrimp (Pleoticus muelleri) from Argentina, frozen crabs (Cardisoma spp) and frozen raw lobsters (Panulirus argus) from Honduras, frozen fillets of mackerel (Scomber spp) and dolphinfish (Coryphaena) from China
  • propargite (0.204 mg/kg – ppm) in dried tomatoes from Tunisia
  • Salmonella (1 out of 5 samples /25g) in betel leaves from India
  • Salmonella (presence /25g) in hulled sesame seeds from India
  • shigatoxin-producing Escherichia coli (in 1 out of 5 samples /25g) in chilled beef from Brazil
  • stones (1.2 %) in white pepper husk from Vietnam
  • too high content of colour E 102 – tartrazine (0.65 %) and unauthorised use of colour E 110 – Sunset Yellow FCF (47.5 mg/kg – ppm) in frozen sweet corn pastry from Colombia
  • too high content of sulphite (2143 mg/kg – ppm) in dried apricots from Turkey
  • unauthorised substance aldrin in chilled peppers from Turkey
  • unauthorised substance carbendazim (1.5 mg/kg – ppm) in peas from Kenya
  • unauthorised substance profenofos (0.04 mg/kg – ppm) in black olives in brine from Peru