Food recalls in EU – Week 48/2015

This week on the EU RASFF (Rapid Alert System for Food and Feed) we can find the following notifications:

1. Alerts followed by a recall from consumers:

2. Information for attention/for follow up followed by a recall from consumers:

3. Alerts followed by a withdrawal from the market:

4. Seizures:

None.

5. Border rejections:

  • acetamiprid (0.081 mg/kg – ppm) in pomegranates from Turkey
  • aflatoxins (B1 = 125; Tot. = 147 / B1 = 47; Tot. = 53 µg/kg – ppb) in pistachios in shell from Iran
  • aflatoxins (B1 = 15.6; Tot. = 17.4 µg/kg – ppb) in pistachios from the United States
  • aflatoxins (B1 = 17.4; Tot. = 18.4 µg/kg – ppb) in chilli powder from Bangladesh
  • aflatoxins (B1 = 27.8; Tot. = 29.39 µg/kg – ppb) in organic hazelnuts, dried figs, (B1 = 32; Tot. = 36 / B1 = 99.1; Tot. = 162.3 / B1 = 16.3; Tot. = 17.29 µg/kg – ppb) in shelled hazelnuts (B1 = 64.95; Tot. = 75.06 µg/kg – ppb) and in crushed roasted hazelnuts (B1 = 7.4; Tot. = 22 / B1 = 9.6; Tot. = 22 µg/kg – ppb) from Turkey
  • aflatoxins (B1 = 7.8; Tot. = 8.8 µg/kg – ppb) in groundnuts from Argentina
  • aflatoxins (B1 = 9.0 µg/kg – ppb) in crushed chillies from India
  • copper (115 mg/kg – ppm) in vine leaves in brine from Turkey
  • FEED: aflatoxins (B1 = 60.3 µg/kg – ppb) in peanuts for bird feeding from Brazil
  • fenpropathrin (0.017 mg/kg – ppm) and imidacloprid (0.021 mg/kg – ppm) and unauthorised substance tolfenpyrad (0.11 mg/kg – ppm) in green tea from Turkey
  • fraudulent health certificate(s) for frozen barramundi fillets (Lates spp) from China
  • improper health certificate(s) for shrimps (Penaeus duorarum) from Côte d’Ivoire with improper packaging (too porous)
  • ivermectin (4.0 µg/kg – ppb) unauthorised in frozen barramundi (Lates spp) from Vietnam
  • mercury (0.78 mg/kg – ppm) in chilled John Dory (Zeus faber) from Tunisia
  • poor temperature control of frozen Argentine red shrimp (Pleoticus muelleri) from Argentina, frozen crabs (Cardisoma spp) and frozen raw lobsters (Panulirus argus) from Honduras, frozen fillets of mackerel (Scomber spp) and dolphinfish (Coryphaena) from China
  • propargite (0.204 mg/kg – ppm) in dried tomatoes from Tunisia
  • Salmonella (1 out of 5 samples /25g) in betel leaves from India
  • Salmonella (presence /25g) in hulled sesame seeds from India
  • shigatoxin-producing Escherichia coli (in 1 out of 5 samples /25g) in chilled beef from Brazil
  • stones (1.2 %) in white pepper husk from Vietnam
  • too high content of colour E 102 – tartrazine (0.65 %) and unauthorised use of colour E 110 – Sunset Yellow FCF (47.5 mg/kg – ppm) in frozen sweet corn pastry from Colombia
  • too high content of sulphite (2143 mg/kg – ppm) in dried apricots from Turkey
  • unauthorised substance aldrin in chilled peppers from Turkey
  • unauthorised substance carbendazim (1.5 mg/kg – ppm) in peas from Kenya
  • unauthorised substance profenofos (0.04 mg/kg – ppm) in black olives in brine from Peru

FVO audit – Post slaughter traceability issues in Luxembourg

An audit to Luxembourg was carried out from 25 November to 4 December 2014. The main objective of the audit was to evaluate the operation of official controls over the traceability of meat (meat of domestic ungulates, poultry, lagomorphs and game meat), minced meat, mechanically separated meat (MSM), meat preparations, meat products (hereafter referred to as meat and products thereof), and composite products containing meat and products thereof and other ingredients.

Particular attention was paid to the traceability, labelling and identification systems of meat and products thereof, and to composite products containing meat and products thereof and traceability of quantities of each ingredient used.

The Competent Authority (CA) responsible for official controls in the scope of the audit has been designated in compliance with Article 4 (1) of Chapter II of Regulation (EC) No 882/2004. The CA is still in the process of amending the National Food Law of 1953 in order to ensure that appropriate action is taken and applicable sanctions are imposed and enforced when non-compliances are identified, as required by Articles 54 and 55 of Regulation (EC) No 882/2004. Within the scope of the audit, the official control plans are implemented as foreseen and are carried out in accordance with documented procedures. Official controls cover identification, labelling and traceability.

However the limited controls on additives, labelling and composition, the lack of systematic control of quantitative traceability or procedures for an in depth verification of food business operators’ (FBOs) traceability procedures and the lack of the possibility to impose administrative sanctions are undermining the effectiveness of official controls.

The CA’s control results for the selected samples indicated non-compliances, but some significant non-compliances related to traceability, labelling and/or the use of additives were not detected. While the system of official controls includes verification of FBOs’ compliance with traceability, application of identification marks and labelling, it is not sufficiently developed. Several deficiencies had not been identified during official controls, in particular, verification of the correctness of the information and content on the label, links between different traceability documents and comprehensive control on the use of ingredients additives and/or spices.

Here you can check the competent Authority answers to the Food Veterinary Office recommendations.