EU Food Law Hanbook

EU Food Law Handbook

edited by: B. v.d. Meulen

ISBN: 978-90-8686-246-7
Price:  € 75.00  (excluding VAT)

Today I want to focus your attention on this really amazing “handbook”, that – despite the name – is really  a complete manual about the fundamentals of EU food law (692 pg.). It touches any argument of interest for practitioners and academics and its multidisciplinary approach grants a broad view on the topics.

The book is edited by Prof. Bernd Van der Muelen and see the participation of really good friends and gifted professionals like Martin Holle (Nutrition policy in the European Union), Cecilia Kuhn and Francesco Montanari (Importing food into the EU), Rozita Spirovska Vaskoska and many others.

The twenty-first century has witnessed a fundamental reform of food law in the European Union, to the point where modern EU food law has now come of age. This ‘EU Food Law Handbook’ presents the most significant elements of these legal developments with contributions from a highly qualified team of academics and practitioners. Their analysis is based on a shared vision of the structure and content of EU food law. The book takes the perspective of food law embedded within general EU law. It highlights the consequences of this combination and provides insights into both substantive and procedural food law.
Taking the General Food Law as a focal point, this handbook analyses and explains the institutional, substantive and procedural elements of EU food law. Principles are discussed as well as specific rules addressing food as a product, the processes related to food and communication about food to consumers through labelling. These rules define requirements on subjects like market authorisation for food additives, novel foods and genetically modified foods, food hygiene, tracking & tracing, withdrawal & recall. The powers of public authorities to enforce food law and to deal with incidents are outlined. Attention is given to the international context (WTO, Codex Alimentarius) as well as to private standards.
In addition to the systematic analysis, the book includes selected topics such as nutrition and health policy, special foods, food import requirements, food contact materials, intellectual property and animal feed.
The ‘EU Food Law Handbook’ is produced in co-operation with the European Institute for Food Law. It is relevant for practitioners and academics both with and without a background in law. It is ideal for education purposes.
To buy the book: link.

Thank god it’s Friday – News from the food world – Week 38

Here’s my article’s selection of the week:

BIRD FLU

– New bird flu strain causing concern for poultry producers in SE Asia, by RJ Whitehead on foodnavigator-asia.com: a recently-emerged strain of avian influenza virus (H5N6) in poultry in Southeast Asia represents a new threat to animal health and livelihoods and must be closely monitored, the United Nation’s Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) has warned;

– FAO issues warning over new strain of avian ‘flu, by Georgi Gyton+ on globalmeatnews.com: the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) has said a new strain of avian influenza, H5N6, needs to be closely monitored in order to avoid a major threat to animal health.

DATE MARKING

– “Expiry date” between Codex Alimentarius and European Commission, by Corrado Finardi: Codex Alimentarius General Standard for the labeling of Prepackaged Foods is currently debating the Date Marking.

GMOs vs. ORGANIC

– Organic farmer viewpoint: Has the “Food Movement” become a religious cult?, by Rob Wallbridge on geneticliteracyproject.org: an interesting article about the necessity to go beyond the dicotomy GMOs/Organic.

US

– Tomato Growers Lose ‘Takings’ Lawsuit Against FDA, by Dan Flinn on foodsafetynews.com: tomato “growers, packers, and shippers” in Florida, Georgia and South Carolina have lost the claim they made for federal reimbursement after the U.S. Food and Drug Administration mistakenly named certain tomatoes as the likely cause of a Salmonella Saintpaul outbreak that later turned out to be caused by Mexican-grown jalapeño and serrano peppers. It is really an interesting topic because reflects a situation which is very well known also to EU producers;

– Regulatory roadblocks to AquaBounty’s GE salmon ‘seriously damage the global credibility of FDA and its objective, science-based approval process’, warn scientists, by Elaine Watson+, on nutraingredients-usa.com: 90 scientists have written to President Obama urging him to press the FDA into making a decision, one way or another, on whether AquaBounty Technologies should be allowed to introduce the first genetically engineered (GE) animal to the human food supply.

– FDA Seeks to Make FSMA Proposals More Flexible, TargetedU.S. Food and Drug Administration is proposing changes to four rules proposed in 2013 to implement the FDA Food Safety and Modernization Act (FSMA): Produce Safety, Preventive Controls for Human Food, Preventive Controls for Animal Food, and Foreign Supplier Verification Programs.