Hinoman’s Vegetable Whole-protein Ingredient Granted GRAS Status

Hinoman, Ltd., has been granted self-affirmed GRAS (Generally Recognized as Safe) status for its Mankai, a vegetable whole-protein ingredient with high nutritional value. The announcement was made during the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) conference in Chicago, July 12-14.

The GRAS designation is for the use of Mankai in functional foods and beverages, and was confirmed based on scientific methods, as well as corroborated by extensive history of use in Asia Pacific. The status was endorsed by a third party-appointed panel composed of some of the top food toxicologists in the U.S. This approval clearly demonstrates Mankai’s preeminence in tests of food safety and purity.

The nutritional composition of the Mankai microgreen ingredient has been determined to be high in protein (at least 45-48%), low in fat (7-8%), with 24-45% carbohydrate content. Analysis of the amino acid composition reveals the protein to be a rich source of the entire group of essential amino acids.

“GRAS approval of the Mankai high-protein ingredient is a major step toward Hinoman becoming a key microgreen protein supplier in the U.S. market,” says Udi Alroy, VP of Marketing and Business Development for Hinoman. “Hinoman’s proprietary cultivation platform makes Mankai a reliable, sustainable food source for large-scale growth and consumption.”

Mankai is produced in an advanced hydroponic system that optimizes yield throughout the year. This precisely regulated aquaculture platform is highly controlled, operating under remote cultivation management and regulation. As a result, it ensures plant purity so that Mankai is clean and free from all pesticides and heavy metals, to a level that exceeds nutritional grade.

“The proprietary Hinoman technology enables strict standards of food safety and security, and both are critical to ensure a sustainable supply chain,” explains Ron Salpeter, CEO for Hinoman. “The system addresses the challenges of future agriculture and nutrition needs with simplicity and sustainability, providing a comprehensive, plant-derived whole-protein food solution.”

Thank God it’s Friday! Quick news from the food world (Week 45)

Here’s my article selection of the week:

EU

– Environment Committee backs flexibility for EU countries to ban GMO crops, from European Parliament ENVI Committee: long-awaited draft plans to allow EU member states to restrict, or ban, the cultivation of crops containing genetically modified organisms on their own territory even if it is allowed at EU level won the support of the Environment Committee on Tuesday. MEPs voted to remove the Council-backed idea of a phase of negotiations with the GMO company, and supported plans to allow member states to ban GMO crops on environmental grounds.

– Italy cracks whip on health claim abusers – fines could reach €5m, by Shane Starling+, on Nutraingredients: regulators in Italy’s €1.2bn food supplements market are cracking the harshest whips against health claims abusers in the EU – a firm was recently fined €250,000 – but will the wounds be deep enough to change the market?

 Fears that German avian flu outbreak could spread, by Ed Bedington, on Globalmeatnews.com: animal health experts are continuing to monitor the outbreak of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N8 in Germany as the yearly migration of wild birds continues to cause concerns the condition might spread.

CHINA

– China Health Food: New Regulations on Nutritional Supplements, by Rachel Shen, on Chemlinked.com: on Nov. 5, 2014, CFDA released the draft of Administrative Provisions on Nutritional Supplements and Requirements on Dossiers for Nutritional Supplements, which gives detailed instructions on regulatory requirements for nutritional supplements in China. The period for public consultation is until Nov. 30, 2014.

NUTRITION

– Mediterranean diet has ‘lasting’ health benefits, say researchers, by Nathan Gray+, on Nutraingredients.com: the health benefits of switching to a Mediterranean style diet and upping the amount of time spent exercising for a period of just eight weeks can still be seen a year after stopping the regime, according to a new study.

USA

– Food Fraud: Money Scam and Health Hazard, by Beth Krietsch, on Foodsafetynews: despite the common belief that food fraud in the United States is a rarity, the globalized nature of our food supply chain means many of our favorite foods and ingredients travel far and wide before they reach our plates, making adulteration and other types of food fraud a considerate problem here as well.

– New App Shows Health Inspection Records for Nearby Restaurants, by James Andrews, on Foodsafetynews.com.

– Revised FSMA Provisions Need More Tweaks, by Lydia Zuraw, on Foodsafetynews.com: the public is generally pleased with the revised provisions of four rules under the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA), but the public comments at the Food and Drug Administration’s public meeting Thursday suggest that the agency may have more tweaking to do.

– Unilever: “Just Mayo” Misleads Consumers Because It’s Not “Mayo”, by David Ter Molen, on FoodIdentityblog.com: on October 31, 2014, Unilever filed suit in the U.S. District Court in New Jersey against Hampton Creek, Inc. for false advertising and unfair competition for selling an egg-free spread under the brand name “Just Mayo.” According to Unilever, the lack of any eggs in the product precludes it from being labeled as “mayonnaise” under federal regulations and consumers are further misled in this regard by the egg on the product label.