Thank God it’s Friday! Quick news from the food world (Week 40)

Here’s my article’s selection for the week:

ASIA

– Sri Lanka suspends sale of Fonterra milk powder batches over illnesses, by Mark Astley+ , on foodnavigator-asia.com: Sri Lanka has suspended the sale of three batches of Fonterra-made Anchor milk powder after complaints of illness in children. The company is heavily criticizing the testing methods adopted by Authorities.

CHOCOLATE

– Chocolate for the summertime: Hershey develops heat resistant chocolate, by Oliver Nieburg+, on confectionerynews.com: Hershey has developed its own method to produce chocolate that can withstand hot climates following similar moves from Mondelēz, Mars and Nestlé.

EU – UK

– UK’s traffic light label is ‘negative’, says Commission, by Annie-Rose Harrison-Dunn+ , 06-Oct-2014, on foodnavigator.com: the UK’s traffic light label has incited more objections than the Nordic keyhole system because the former is more negative in its nutrition guidance, says the European Commission.

– Horsemeat rears its head again, as firm is fined £5,000, by Laurence Gibbons+, on foodmanufacture.co.uk: Horsemeat has reared its head again after food import firm Expo Foods Ltd was fined £5,000, yesterday (October 2), after its pork sausagemeat was found to contain nearly 50% horsemeat.

– Does ‘history of safe consumption’ mean foods are safe?, by Annie-Rose Harrison-Dunn+ , on foodnavigator.com: proposals to create a separate process for novel food approval from countries outside of the EU will not see the market flooded with unsafe foods, a European Commission official told a concerned audience at a European Parliament workshop.

– Hot political potatoes: DG SANCO head talks suspended caffeine and bowel botanical claims, by Annie-Rose Harrison-Dunn+ , on nutraingredients.com: the pending health claims for caffeine and bowel-function botanical hydroxyanthracene are the “hot potatoes” being dealt with by EFSA and the European Commission, according to the head of the Commission’s unit for nutrition, food composition and information (DG SANCO).

JAPAN

– McDonald’s Japan forecasts big 2014 loss after food safety scare, on fortune.com: facing tough competition from domestic convenience stores, McDonald’s Japan had been suffering from weak demand even before the food safety scare, in which a major Chinese supplier of chicken meat was found to be in breach of safety standards. Now the company is also under pressure in Russia, where McDonald’s it is under the aim of retorsive measures for the economic sanctions imposed by Western countries.

RUSSIA – ASF CRISIS

– MEPS demand more action to stop spread of ASF, by Méabh McMahon, in Brussels, on globalmeatnews.com: the European Commission’s response to Europe’s African swine fever (ASF) crisis was criticised at the European Parliament yesterday (Tuesday 7 October) for being too weak.

USA

– Is a new organization to define “natural” a good idea?, by Michele Simon, on foodlawfirm.com: a point of view about the discussed and abused term “natural” in US:

 

Nestlè challenge Mondelez on not-melting chocolate

It was November 2012 when Cadbury (a Mondelez owned company) filed a patent for its not-melting chocolate.

The patent said that:

“It is believed that less temperature tolerant chocolates tend to comprise a more fat continuous system where the sugar particles are coated in fat. We have found that it is possible to instill more favorable temperature tolerant properties into a conched chocolate by refining the conched chocolate after the conching step. Without being bound by theoretical considerations it is believed that this leads to shearing of sugar particles in the conched chocolate leading to exposed faces of the sugar particles, i.e. faces which are not coated in fat. Such exposed sugar particle faces contribute towards a more sugar continuous system (sugar matrix) reducing the percentage of fat coated sugar particles which is believed to be advantageous for temperature tolerant properties.”

Nestec, Nestlè R&D center, on the other hand has developed its hot tolerant chocolate by adding little or no sugar to the chocolate core and instead adding the humectant liquids to a “tropicalized shell” for the product.

The patent was filed in December, but it is public only from the last week.

The core could melt at high temperature, but the shell will resist and the product will maintain its shape until 45 °C.

Different methods, but the same goal for both the companies: to conquer emerging and huge markets like Brazil and India.

There is only one problem: it’s almost from the time of the World War II that companies are trying to develop such a product, but the taste never satisfied the consumers! Kraft have tried to develop a similar product some years ago, but they failed and left the run.

Hershey’s Tropical Ration or K bar, was the first example of not melting chocolate, but as said by Colonel Pual Logan (one of the inventors) it tasted just “a little better than a boiled potato”. Furthermore, and what if your chocolate doesn’t melt in your mouth?

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