Books – CHINA: How to export more or better – Introduction to Chinese food law

It is almost commonplace to remember that China is one of the world powers whose growth increases from year to year. In this context, the eagerness of Chinese consumers for imported foodstuffs in general and Europeans in particular does nothing but increase.

However, it is also true that the law covering the food industry in China is presented as an extremely complex and constantly evolving; additional difficulty is exacerbated by the unstable criteria of local implementation by the competent authorities.

To meet the demand of those who want to experience the food law in that country, Thompson-Reuters-Aranzadi published in Spanish: “Introducción al Derecho alimentario” authored by an experienced italian lawyer, resident in Shanghai for several years, Nicola Aporti and edited by Luis González Vaqué:

http://www.tienda.aranzadi.es/productos/libros/introduccion-al-derecho-alimentario-en-china/6029/4294967293

The new book has been patronized by the “China European Union Food Law Working Party”. Its objective is to be descriptive, focusing on the main aspects of the most outstanding subjects and aspects of food law in China: authorities and regulations, production, distribution and supply of food, food imports, control and responsibilities, application of intellectual property rights, etc.

Its content is not only informative but its aim is to be useful to guide lawyers and entrepreneurs interested in exporting foods to China. The Food Security Act (LSA) and the Administrative Regulations for the registration of foreign producers of imported food products, two key provisions of the Chinese legal system governing the food sector are included in English version.

Elliot review published today!

Professor Chris Elliott’s final report into the integrity and assurance of UK food supply networks has been published today. You can download the report at the following link.

The review was prompted by growing concerns about the systems used to deter, identify and prosecute food adulteration. The horse meat crisis of 2013 was a trigger, as were concerns about the increasing potential for food fraud and ‘food crime’. Food fraud becomes food crime when it no longer involves random acts by ‘rogues’ within the food industry but becomes an organised activity by groups which knowingly set out to deceive, and or injure, those purchasing food. These incidents can have a huge negative impact both on consumer confidence, and on the reputation and finances of food businesses.

The Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs published also the document Government response to the “Elliott review of the integrity and assurance of food supply networks”.

Enjoy the reading and stay tuned for comments about the documents.