New Low-sodium, MSG-free Salt Ingredient Boost flavor and saltiness in Sauces

In the rush to the salt reduction is common to see new ingredients on the market which should help products’ reformulation. If in Italy, for instance, for the soups there is a voluntary protocol signed by the Associations for salt reduction, in many countries in the world (South Africa is the last one I discovered) there are legislative boundaries for salt content in several categories of foodstuffs, and the trend is: “reduction”.

Salt of the Earth Ltd. launches its Umami-Essence Sea Salt ingredient especially designed for a comprehensive range of sauces. Using Umami-Essence Sea Salt in a new or existing product formulation can help dramatically decrease sodium levels—in some formulations by up to 50%—while boosting flavor. The all-natural Umami-Essence Sea Salt is low in sodium and, most importantly, contains no MSG or artificial ingredients.

“This innovative ingredient can help food manufacturers keep the consumer-craved salty flavor while maintaining a low amount of sodium in the final application,” explains Aliza Ravizki, R&D manager of Salt of the Earth. “It’s a ready-to-use liquid formulation that can naturally intensify umami, the so-called 5th taste of the finished dish.”

The characteristics of Umami-Essence Sea Salt help food scientists innovate healthier reduced-salt recipes that contain only natural ingredients and don’t compromise flavor,” explains Giorit Carmi, Marketing Manager for Salt of the Earth. “It provides food manufacturers a much simpler way to include a clean label claim on products and to comply with the global salt-reduction agenda of cutting sodium in processed foods.”

“This is the first specifically umami-enhancing ingredient developed by Salt of The Earth,” adds Ravizki. “We tested the formulation in a range of sauces, pizza toppings and more and achieved outstanding results in terms of saltiness and savory flavor. This superior ingredient enables clean labeling while avoiding MSG and enhancing the final product flavor.”

The sweeter the better? EU and US approve advantame use as food additive

The following is my first article on LinkedIn as publisher, a special account released by the platform to influencers and valuable bloggers in their respective sector. Here you can find the article on LinkedIn.

Now you can follow me also on LinkedIn to share our thoughts about food safety and regulations on a broader platform. I hope this will give our blog a greater audience!


On 19th May 2014 the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced the safety of use of the additive advantame in food, with the exception of meat and poultry. The FDA final rule will be effective from 21st May 2014.

Food additives in USA are subjected to premarket review and approval by FDA – like in this case – or have to demonstrate their safety through the so called “GRAS” procedure. “GRAS” is an acronym for the phrase Generally Recognized ASafe and means that if a food additive has been adequately shown to be safe under the conditions of its intended use, there is no need of the premarket approval by FDA.

FDA evaluated data from 37 animal and human studies and did not identify possible toxic effects, such as reproductive, neurological, and cancer-causing effects. Therefore, advantame has been approved for use as a general-purpose sweetener and flavor enhancer and can be used in baked goods, non-alcoholic beverages (including soft drinks), chewing gum, confections and frostings, frozen desserts, gelatins and puddings, jams and jellies, processed fruits and fruit juices, toppings, and syrups.

In the meantime, the European Union was evaluating the approval of the substance as well.

On 31st July 2013 the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) released a Scientific Opinion on the safety of advantame as food additive. EFSA’s findings were very similar to FDA evaluation and the Authority concluded for the safety of use of the substance.

Anyway, the evaluating Panel noted that there is an indication of advantame instability in acidic beverages and thermally treated foods, and also that there are critical effects observed in animal studies, especially about maternal toxicity (gastrointestinal disturbances) in the prenatal developmental toxicity study in rabbits.

For that reason the Panel established a precautionary ADI (adequate daily intake) of 5 mg/kg bodyweight/day, assessing that conservative estimate of advantame exposure for high level adults and children consumers were below the ADI for the proposed use levels.

On 15th May 2014 was published on the Official Journal of the European Union the new EU Regulation n. 497/2014, which authorize from 4th June 2014 the use of advantame in several categories of food, such as flavoured fermented milk products, confectionery, cocoa and chocolate products, fruit and vegetable preparations excluding compote, jam, jellies, sweetened chestnut puree, chewing gum, breakfast cereals, bakery products, flavoured drinks, fruit nectars, soups, sauces, dietary foods and food supplements. Advantame will be classified and indicated on labels as E 969.

In 2013, the sweetener was evaluated also by JECFA (Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives) which issued the same conclusion again: advantame is safe for the intended use. The Committee proposed an acceptable daily intake (ADI) of 0–5 mg/kg body weight (bw) and agreed that the ADI also applies to those individuals with phenylketonuria, as the formation of phenylalanine from the normal use of advantame would not be significant in relation to this condition.

Advantame is an high-intensity sweetener, offering consumers and the food industry the option to choose from a wider selection of sweeteners, thus reducing the intake of each individual sweetener.