Food recalls in EU/Week 38

This week on the RASFF database (Rapid Alert System for Food and Feed) we have two recalls from consumers in EU in the alert notifications:

– Pathogenic micro-organisms: Salmonella Rissen in chlorella powder, following company’s own check. Origin China (via United Kingdom), notified by Netherlands;

Foreign bodies: plastic fragments in chocolate bars, following a consumer complaint. Origin Finland, notified by Finland, distributed also to Sweden.

Between the alert notifications, followed by a withdrawal from the market of the product, we find:

– Foreign bodies: glass fragments in quorn cordon bleu, following company’s own check. Origin United Kingdom, notified by Belgium;

– Industrial contaminants: benzo(a)pyrene and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in cocoa bean powder, following an official control on the market. Origin Spain, notified by Slovakia;

– Pathogenic and non-pathogenic micro-organisms: Clostridium perfringens and high aerobic plate count in beans and chickpeas, following company’s own check. Origin Germany, notified from Norway;

 Pesticide residues: omethoate and unauthorised substance carbofuran in fresh aubergines, following company’s own check. Origin Malaysia, notified by Netherlands, distributed also to Austria, Finland and Germany;

– Pesticide residues: pyraclostrobin in fresh scarole, following company’s own check. Origin Belgium, notified from Belgium, distributed also to Luxembourg;

– Pesticide residues: chlorpyriphos in turnips, following company’s own check. Origin Belgium, notified from Belgium, distributed also to Luxembourg;

– Pesticide residues: methomyl in papaya, following company’s own check. Origin Malaysia, notified by Netherlands, distributed also to France and Germany;

– Residues of veterinary medicinal products: prohibited substace chloramphenicol in frozen shrimps, following an official control on the market. Origin Vietnam, notified by Germany, distributed also to Netherlands.

Amongst border rejections we have:

– aflatoxins in pistachios, shelled pistachios and in pistachio kernels from Iran, in shelled almonds from Australia, in blanched groundnut kernels from China, in blanched runner groundnuts from Brazil and in ground chilli powder from India;

– Salmonella spp. in betel/paan leaves from India;

– peanuts from China infested with insects;

– chlorpyriphoscyhalothrin and unauthorised substance dichlorvos in oil seeds from Nigeria;

– abnormal smell of black pepper from Vietnam infested with moulds;

– difenoconazole in broccoli from China;

– improper import declaration for frozen fish filets tilapia from China and absence of health certificate(s) for fish oil Omega 3 from the United States;

– mercury in chilled sea bream from Egypt;

– anthraquinone in green tea from China.

For feed, we have an alert notification, followed by a withdrawal from the market:

– Composition: high content of selenium in complete feed for piglets, following company’s own check. Origin Netherlands, notified by Netherlands, distributed also to Germany.

and a border rejection for high count of Enterobacteriaceae in fish meal from Mauritania.

For food contact materials we have a border rejection for migration of primary aromatic amines from slotted spoons from China.

Related articles

FSA UK – Views wanted on sporopollenin shells as novel food

A UK company has applied to the Food Standards Agency for approval to market sporopollenin shells from a type of plant known as clubmoss Lycopodium clavatum, as a novel food ingredient. Views are wanted on the independent experts’ draft opinion.

The company, Sporomex Ltd, plans to market sporopollenin shells as a novel food ingredient to be included in this range of foods:

  • food supplements
  • bakery products
  • breakfast cereals
  • dairy products and dairy substitutes
  • foods for special medical purposes
  • foods for use in energy-restricted diets for weight reduction
  • foods for particular nutritional uses (‘PARNUTs’, as defined in Directive 2009/39/EC’)

Sporopollenin shells are produced by emptying spores from Lycopodium clavatum of their genetic, lipid and protein material to leave an empty sporopollenin shell. The applicant’s intention is to fill the empty shell with functional ingredients such as fish oils or vitamins. The applicant states that sporopollenin shells will therefore function as a system to deliver functional ingredients more effectively into the body.

The novel ingredient plus its contents make a powder which could be incorporated into food or drink by the consumer or manufacturer.

Deadline for comments: 10th May 2014.

(Source: FSA website)